Peter Brook and Marat/Sade

Better Essays
Topics: Performance
It is noted in many books that near the start of his career, Peter Brook was attracted to both plays and techniques that expressed human contradiction. He often wondered, though, whether there were any modern playwrights who could possibly equal the richness and complexity of Shakespearean verse, and often complained about the improbability of ever finding material to work on or to produce as stimulating as that of Shakespeare. When, in 1964, Brook received a play entitled The Persecution and Assassination of Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade (Marat/Sade), by German playwright Peter Weiss, it is also noted that Brook felt he had finally encountered the challenge of Shakespearean theater he was looking for. Not only was Marat/Sade an incredibly well written and unique approach to theater as a whole, its incorporation of music and movement, song and montage, and naturalism and surrealism within the text created the perfect passage, for Brook, from his commercial past to his experimental present, as well as a way for both the playwright and the director to deal with the concept of theater as therapy; a rather ironic, yet at the same time clever, idea seeing as how the play itself is conducted within the confines of an asylum, with the inmates themselves as the stars. One of the most complex aspects of presenting Marat/Sade was its large and eclectic cast of characters and also its incorporation of a play within a play. On stage, these points were, looking at the opinions of a majority of both the audiences and the critics, presented successfully by Brook and the cast he worked with. From the prison guards who loomed in the background, clothed in butcher aprons and armed with clubs, to the half-naked Marat, slouched in a tub and covered in wet rags, forever scratching and writing, to the small group of singers, dressed and painted up as clowns, to the narcoleptic but murderous Charlotte Corday, Weiss


Bibliography: Lunatics, Lovers, and Poets by Margaret Croyden

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    The Empty Space Peter Brook’s The Empty Space is a book full of precise opinion that criticizes the present day status of theater. He goes into extreme detail and theory in four different aspects of theater: Deadly, Holy, Rough, and Immediate. Each of these aspects deals with different attributes of the theater that Peter Brook thinks are lacking in current theater today. While reading this book many emotions filled my conscience. I understood where he was coming from on a lot of his views, but…

    • 1689 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Death of Marat

    • 1597 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Essay assignment: Death of Marat A analysis of death in neo-classicism I love the story of a conversation that took place at an English country house during a dinner party, where the host had just started up the discussion of death and asked the various guests what will happen to them after they die. Some thought about reincarnation and others though about different plains of being, and others thought that they were going to be annihilated. All of the guests had answered the question except…

    • 1597 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Death of Marat

    • 1624 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The portrait of Marat encapsulates the artist’s grief, political fervour and artistic abilty. It is a personal homage to his friend, as seen by an inscription on the side of a make shift desk.’ A marat David’ Find brushwork in the corpse. The artist has striped the painting to its bare essentials in which the artist created a powerful and moving image with a tragic solemnity of the Pieta. A gruesome subject to depict. The artist has commorated an event. Created a portrait of a martyr. A…

    • 1624 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Death Of Marat

    • 841 Words
    • 4 Pages

    I like the placement of the fake dead body since it provides a shocking effect to the viewer. behind the Death of Marat, there is a drawing of Kim Jung Gi Legend of Kyoto, and the five ceramic piece by Yuji Ueda, which is like creating a sense of witnessing the “death” of Ai Wei Wei. One work during my journey of this exhibition, Geoff Mcfetridge’s Bearspaw 2016 is…

    • 841 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    about the incident. Amari stated that: "His ten-year-old sister (Synara) goes in the room when he asleep and touched and rubbed his private part. Amari was asked did his mother (Sade) knew about Synara coming in the bedroom and rubbed and touched his private part. Amari did not respond to the question. It is unknown if Sade knows about Synara going in Amri's bedroom touched and rubbed on his private…

    • 151 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The two pieces of art I have chosen are “The Death of Marat “by Jacques Louis David, painted in 1793 and Vik Muniz’ modern recreation of the same painting from his series of works “Pictures of Garbage” 2008. “The Death of Marat” by David http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/his/CoreArt/art/neocl_dav_marat.html Vik Muniz’ “Marat” http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703440004575548581385394008.html The most obvious comparison between these two works is the subject matter as one is…

    • 1142 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Gwendolyn Brooks

    • 1962 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Brooks, Gwendolyn (Elizabeth) Brooks, Gwendolyn (Elizabeth) From "Encyclopedia of African-American Writing" Poet—this one word describes every cell of Gwendolyn Brooks 's being. It was always poetry—from her Chicago childhood to her 1950 Pulitzer Prize to her awakening social consciousness to her Illinois Poet Laureate status and through all the other honors and awards. It was always poetry—and few writers besides Brooks can speak volumes with so few words. Gwendolyn Brooks, Pulitzer Prize…

    • 1962 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Gwendolyn Brooks

    • 579 Words
    • 3 Pages

    is a poem wrote by Gwendolyn Brooks in 1966, which is one of the popular poem she did. She’s an African American born in Topeka, Kansas and raised in Chicago. She is the author of numerous poetry, including “Blacks” (1981), Annie Allen (1949), for which she received the Pulitzer Prize, and the “Children Coming Home” (The David Co., 1991). She also wrote several other books such as, “Negro Hero” (1945), “Maud Martha” (1953), “In the Mecca” (1968) and many more. Brooks was named Poet Laureate of congress…

    • 579 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Garth Brooks

    • 730 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Gath Brooks Troyal Garth Brooks (also know as Garth Brooks) is the world’s greatest country singer of all time. He was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma on February 7, 1962. He was raised in the small town of Yukon with country music in his blood. He was the youngest child in his family that consisted of six children. His Mother, Colleen Carroll, was a Professional country singer while she raised Garth and his five other siblings with her husband, Troyal Carroll. Troyal worked as a engineer for Unocal…

    • 730 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jack Brooks

    • 747 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Jack Brooks once stated that “Every disaster is an opportunity,” and he was absolutely correct. Brooks’ statement especially holds true to politicians. Politicians are in a constant struggle to gain the support of the citizens, and to be successful they need take advantage of every presented opportunity to get seen and heard by the public. Disasters stimulate fear and excitement in the public, therefore the public pays a lot of attention to them (Popkin, 25). In turn politicians are attentive…

    • 747 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays