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Persuasive Essay On Miranda Rights

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Persuasive Essay On Miranda Rights
The rights you are read while being placed under arrest are the Miranda rights. They state that what you say will be used against you in court and that you have the right to an attorney. These rights are read to protect your freedom and to inform you of your constitutional rights. It became procedure to state the rights after the Miranda vs. Arizona case. Ernesto Miranda was sentenced to 20-30 years in prison for counts of kidnapping and rape. In court, Miranda argued that he did not know his rights and that they should have been told to him. He is the reason that criminal suspects receive more justice from police officers.

There is an enormous amount of bad reputations for police these days. Some have been shown
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We should be allowed the rights to fair trials. The trials we undergo in a court of law can drastically affect our lives. We are allowed the right to an attorney that we can pay or be appointed. We also have a right to a jury of our peers to ensure that there is no bias in deciding guilt or innocence. Also, during interrogation we have the right to not self incriminate ourselves. We don't have answer, write, or confess anything against our will. We have these rights in the U.S constitution, but they are restated when we are read our Miranda rights. This ensures that we will be treated fairly in questioning and in …show more content…
When suspects are facing trial they can defend themselves, hire an attorney, or have one appointed by the state. Having a lawyer can help because they have training in defending their clients. This right also protects the poor suspects who can not afford a lawyer to represent them. The people that can not afford one can choose to have a lawyer or to represent themselves. It is a good idea to have a lawyer because he will be best fit to defend someone because of his experience and practice.

In conclusion, The Miranda rights are truly more than words. They are our protection and warning. They help police do a good job, they protect our lives and our property, they protect us in questioning, and they protect us in trial. Ernesto Miranda may have been a bad criminal, but his failure to stay silent protects our freedom

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