Period 4 Vocabulary

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Vocabulary 1450-1750
Match the term to the definition. To create a better review sheet, write the term instead of the letter.
A. Absolute monarchy
B. Boyars
C. Capitalism
D. Caravel
E. Catholic reformation
F. Columbian exchange
G. Commercial revolution
H. Cossacks
I. Creoles
J. Deism
K. Devshirme
L. Divine right
M. Dutch learning
N. Empirical research
O. Encomienda
P. Enlightenment
Q. Estates-general
R. Excommunication
S. Factor
T. Glorious revolution
U. Hagia Sophia
V. Heliocentric revolution
W. Indulgence
X. Janissaries
Y. Jesuits
Z. Laissez-faire economics
AA. Manchus
AB. Mercantilism
AC. Mestizos
AD. Middle passage
AE. Mughal dynasty
AF. Mulato
AG. Nation-state
AH. Natural laws
AI. Ninety-five Theses
AJ. Northern Renaissance
AK. Northwest Passage
AL. Parliamentary monarchy
AM. Peninsulares
AN. Philosophes
AO. Predestination
AP. Protestant reformation
AQ. Purdah
AR. Qing dynasty
AS. Reconquista
AT. Repartamiento
AU. Scientific revolution
AV. Sovereignty
AW. Taj Mahal
AX. Tokugawa Shogunate
AY. Treaty of Tordesillas
AZ. Triangular trade
BA. Viceroyalty

A document whose purchase was said to grant the bearer the forgiveness of sins

A European economic policy of the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries that held that there was a limited amount of wealth available, and that each country must adopt policies to obtain as much wealth as possible for itself; key to the attainment of wealth was the acquisition of colonies

A European intellectual movement in the seventeenth century that established the basis for modern science

A government with a king or queen whose power is limited by the power of a parliament

A passage through the North America Continent that was sought early by explorers to North America as a route to trade with the east

A philosophical movement in eighteenth century Europe that was based on reason and the concept that education and training could improve human society

A political unit ruled by a viceroy that was the basis of

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