Pathway to Stability and Strength: The New Deal

Topics: Franklin D. Roosevelt, World War II, New Deal Pages: 4 (1398 words) Published: April 30, 2014
The New Deal

After years of depression, hunger, and economic crisis in the United States during the 1930’s, congress and president Franklin D. Roosevelt had to come up with programs and changes to ensure an escape from the great depression, and a pathway to stability and strength in America. It is well known that the new deal was intended for the 3 R’s. Recovery, Relief, and Reform. Both congress, and the executive branch came up with ideas of reconstruction and political changes to guarantee better life for the citizens, and assure that the great depression will not repeat itself. Roosevelt was elected into office in 1932 and addressed the public by saying “I pledge myself to a new deal for the American people. This is more than a political campaign. It is a call to arms.” His main intention was to explain that it was a time of struggle for everyone, and that it was time for all people to come together as one and lift the United States from its economical downfall. With help from everyone, anything is possible.

Some of the major changes that occurred in the first few months of Roosevelt’s presidency is that he ended prohibition. Alcohol was legal again, and that was a major factor in the economy. Multiple acts were signed for the construction of dams, bridges, and power plants, all which created more and more jobs for the american people, however the workers needed a better and safer working environment and that’s when Roosevelt signed the National Industrial Recovery Act which allowed workers to suggest for higher raises and better working conditions. With the quick and sudden changes The U.S saw slight changes to its economy, but the people were not fully content. “In the spring of 1935, Roosevelt launched a second, more aggressive series of federal programs, sometimes called the Second New Deal.” (History.com Staff) The WPA was created for the unemployed, specifically to work on offices, schools, parks, and highways. Also, the Wagner Act and the Social...

Cited: History.com Staff, . "New Deal." History.com. A E Networks, n.d. Web. 14 Mar 2014. .
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