Party Train: a Vans Warped Tour History

Powerful Essays
Mayralee Guzman
Tamara Holloway
April 30th, 2012
“Party Train!”: A History of Vans Warped Tour
Summer heat, loud music, endless partying and people you'll never forget. That's what people think all across the country when they hear the words “Warped Tour!”. Every summer from June to August artists from all over the world, playing all genres of music, join this spectacular festival. How exactly was this tour started? Who was the founder? Why was it started? And who are all these amazing people that one meets at a festival such as this? Vans Warped Tour means so much to so many people, because of this knowing the history of this amazing festival is imperative.
The birth of Warped Tour happened in 1994, the founder being Kevin Lyman. The first lineup for the festival consisted of only nineteen bands. This may seem like a lot to someone who has never attended the tour, or a festival like it, but when compared to 104 bands playing in this year's (2012) lineup, 19 bands is a miniscule amount. Many people have been mislead, they believe that since the tour was founded in 1994 that this was the first year it took place, this is incorrect, the first actual Warped Tour took place in the summer of 1995. The 1995 lineup had mostly punk rock bands like CIV, Deftones, Face to Face, Fluf, L7, My Bloody Valentine, No Doubt, No Use for a Name, and Ore Ska Band, just to name some. Someone attending the tour today has probably not heard much, if at all, about some of the bands from the first lineup, considering the average age of Vans Warped Tour attendee is 17-18. Meaning the average attendee was born the year that Warped was started.
This year the lineup consists of mostly alternative rock bands, but there is something for everyone there. With artists ranging from T. Mills (Rap, Hip-Hop), to Miss May I (Screamo), and even It Boys! (Pop). Anyone attending the festival is guaranteed to have a great time. In fact Vans Warped Tour provides something that they call a “Reverse

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