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Parental Attachment and Emotional Development

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Parental Attachment and Emotional Development
HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
PARENTAL ATTACHMENT AND EMOTIONAL
DEVELOPMENT

A PAPER SUBMITTED TO
PROFESSOR DAPHNE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF COUNSELLING IN FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR

COUN 502

BY
PAMELA E. CAMERON

LIBERTY UNIVERSY VIRGINIA, USA AUGUST 16, 2013

Abstract
Parental attachment is a foundational part of human development. There are various patterns of development; each pattern affects the overall be-havior of the child. The early bond between infant and parent is crucial, though research reveals that some parents are unaware of the critical role attachment plays in infant development. Such lack of awareness causes the destabilization of the structure that creates emotional connection be-tween child and parent, which can affect the child in negative ways as she or he grows, including criminal activity, substance abuse, and gang activities. Related factors that may lead a child to engage in these activi-ties include the influence of parental alcoholism, drug abuse, domestic violence, and divorce, as well as child abuse and neglect. My continuing focus will demonstrate how a positive emotional influence beginning in infancy can impact the adult. The positive outcome of emotional at-tachment is manifested in outcomes such as social competency, academic achievement, spiritual fulfillment, and emotional stability.

Key word: Delinquency, infant, emotional attachment, influence, sta-bility

Introduction
Parental attachment is an important aspect of lifespan development; this attachment begins at the stage of infancy, and is a close emotional bond between infant and caregivers (mother). How caregivers respond to these needs has a life span impact on the development and maintenance of all relationships. Attachment theory places emphasises on the notion that who we are is subjected to the connection we have with

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