Parent Involvement in Emergent Literacy Activities

Topics: Reading, Dyslexia, Early childhood education Pages: 8 (2364 words) Published: December 19, 2006
Parent Involvement in Emergent Literacy Activities: The Relationship to Reading Achievement

By
Tracy J. Miranowski
B.A. Minnesota State Mankato, 2004

A Starred Paper
Submitted to the Graduate Facility
of
St. Cloud State University

Table of Contents

Chapter 1Page

Introduction………………………………………………………3

Historical Perspectives…………………………………...............4-6

Current Emergent Literacy Approaches………………………….6-8

Focus of the Paper………………………………………. ………8

Importance of Review…………………………………………....9

Definitions………………………………………………………..10

Chapter 1

INTRODUCTION

During the last 3 decades, increased attention has been focused upon the effects of home literacy environment and children's later knowledge (Roberts, Jurgens, & Burchinal, 2005). It was once believed that children learned to read and write only when they entered elementary school and received specific instruction. However, most research now indicates that the home environment is critical in the development of a variety of cognitive and linguistic skills and that it is an important factor in early literacy development (Levy, Gong, Hessels, Evans, & Jared, 2006; Rashia, Morris, & Sevick, 2005; Weigel, Martin, & Bennett, 2006). Research has shown that home experiences need to be developmentally appropriate and should emphasize the natural unfolding of skills through the enjoyment of books, positive interactions between young children and adults, and literacy-rich activities (Roberts et al., 2005). Probably no area of education has seen as much controversy over teaching methodology as beginning reading instruction (Teale, 1995). Two phases of reading development are typically discussed in the literature. The first is the preschool period, which signifies the time before formal instruction begins. The preschool phase of reading is typically associated with home, childcare or preschool settings, and with adults who are parents or child-care providers (Teale, 1995). The second, the beginning reading phase, commences with formal instruction in reading. Much of this instruction has focused upon children no younger than age 6, which our society has generally selected for reading instruction to begin (Justice & Kaderavek, 2004; Neuman & Dickinson, 2003; Teale, 1995). Emergent literacy is the term used to describe these early childhood reading experiences. Emergent implies something that is noticeably evolving and suitable, not a specific point or period in time, and literacy stresses the interrelatedness of the language arts (Slegers, 1996). Emergent literacy is based upon the concept that children attain literacy skills not only as a result of direct instruction but also as a product of a stimulating and reactive environment where children are exposed to print, observe the operations of print, and are motivated and encouraged to connect with print (Britto & Brooks-Gunn, 2001). The 1994 International Encyclopedia of Education defines emergent literacy as "referring to the reading and writing behavior that children exhibit before they learn to read and write conventionally" (as cited in Slegers, 1996, p. 4). To understand the significance of home literacy in the development of children's literacy I will discuss in this paper the extent to which parent involvement in specific home literacy practices are related to reading achievement in preschool through third grade. In addition, I will explore current literacy approaches that are used to enhance emergent literacy skills.

Historical Perspectives on Emergent Literacy
The 20th century marked the beginning of the age of modern research in reading education. Psychologist and educators were primarily engaged in applying "scientific" method to the study of reading and learning to read. Researchers have used a variety of tools and techniques to gather data and draw conclusions. Our understanding of how readers read, how children learn to read, and how reading can best be taught has increased...

References: Comprehension. Demonstrates how well a student understands what they are reading or have read (McCardle, & Chhabra, 2004).
Decoding. Recognizing the pronunciation of printed words by applying the many correspondences between particular letters and phonemes (Neuman & Dickinson, 2003).
Graphemes. The relationship between the letters and the combinations used (McCardle & Chhabra, 2004).
Phonemes. The individual sounds of spoken language. English consists of 41-44 phonemes (McCardle & Chhabra, 2004).
Phonological awareness. Ability to reflect on units of spoken language smaller than the syllable including blending, segmentation, deletion, word – to –word, matching and/or sound word matching (Neuman, & Dickinson, 2003)
Visual/orthographic
Hill, S. E., & Nichols, S. (2006). Emergent literacy: Symbols at work. Manwan, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers.
Justice, L. M., Kaderavek, J. (2004). Exploring the continuum of emergent to conventional literacy: Transitioning special learners. Reading and Writing Quarterly, 20(1), 231-236.
Levy, B.A., Gong, Z., Hessels, S., Evans, M. A., & Jared, D. (2006). Understanding print: Early reading development and the contributions of home literacy. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 93(1), 63-93.
McCardle, P., & Chabra, V. (2004). The voice of evidence in reading research. Paul Brooks Publishing Co.
Morrison, F. T., Bachman, H. J. & Connor, C. M. (2005). Improving literacy in America: Guidelines from research (Vol. 1). New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
Neuman, S
Rashia, F. L., Morris, R.D., & Sevcik, R.A. (2005). Relationship between home literacy environments and reading achievement in children with reading disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 38 (1), 2-11
Roberts, J., Jurgens, J., & Burchinal, M
Saint-Laurent, L., & Giasson, J. (2005). Effects of a family literacy program adapting parental intervention to first graders ' evolution of reading and writing abilities. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 5(3), 253-278
Sawyer, W
Slegers, B. (1996). A review of the research and literature on emergent literacy.
Teale, W. H. (1995). Young children and reading: Trends across the twentieth century. Journal of Education, 177(3), 95-127.
Weigel, D. J., Martin, S. S., & Bennett, K. K. (2006). Contributions of the home literacy environment to preschool-aged children 's emerging literacy and language skills. Early Child Development and Care, 176(3), 357-378.
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Emergent Literacy Essay
  • Emergent Literacy Essay
  • Emergent Literacy Essay
  • Parent Involvement Essay
  • Parent Involvement Essay
  • Essay on Parent Involvement
  • parent involvement Essay
  • Emergent Literacy Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free