Parent Involvement in Emergent Literacy Activities

Powerful Essays
Parent Involvement in Emergent Literacy Activities: The Relationship to Reading Achievement

By
Tracy J. Miranowski
B.A. Minnesota State Mankato, 2004

A Starred Paper
Submitted to the Graduate Facility of St. Cloud State University

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Page

Introduction………………………………………………………3

Historical Perspectives…………………………………...............4-6

Current Emergent Literacy Approaches………………………….6-8

Focus of the Paper………………………………………. ………8

Importance of Review…………………………………………....9

Definitions………………………………………………………..10

Chapter 1

INTRODUCTION

During the last 3 decades, increased attention has been focused upon the effects of home literacy environment and children 's later knowledge (Roberts, Jurgens, & Burchinal, 2005). It was once believed that children learned to read and write only when they entered elementary school and received specific instruction. However, most research now indicates that the home environment is critical in the development of a variety of cognitive and linguistic skills and that it is an important factor in early literacy development (Levy, Gong, Hessels, Evans, & Jared, 2006; Rashia, Morris, & Sevick, 2005; Weigel, Martin, & Bennett, 2006). Research has shown that home experiences need to be developmentally appropriate and should emphasize the natural unfolding of skills through the enjoyment of books, positive interactions between young children and adults, and literacy-rich activities (Roberts et al., 2005). Probably no area of education has seen as much controversy over teaching methodology as beginning reading instruction (Teale, 1995). Two phases of reading development are typically discussed in the literature. The first is the preschool period, which signifies the time before formal instruction begins. The preschool phase of reading is typically associated with home, childcare or preschool settings, and with adults who are parents or child-care providers (Teale, 1995). The second, the



References: Comprehension. Demonstrates how well a student understands what they are reading or have read (McCardle, & Chhabra, 2004). Decoding. Recognizing the pronunciation of printed words by applying the many correspondences between particular letters and phonemes (Neuman & Dickinson, 2003). Graphemes. The relationship between the letters and the combinations used (McCardle & Chhabra, 2004). Phonemes. The individual sounds of spoken language. English consists of 41-44 phonemes (McCardle & Chhabra, 2004). Phonological awareness. Ability to reflect on units of spoken language smaller than the syllable including blending, segmentation, deletion, word – to –word, matching and/or sound word matching (Neuman, & Dickinson, 2003) Visual/orthographic Hill, S. E., & Nichols, S. (2006). Emergent literacy: Symbols at work. Manwan, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers. Justice, L. M., Kaderavek, J. (2004). Exploring the continuum of emergent to conventional literacy: Transitioning special learners. Reading and Writing Quarterly, 20(1), 231-236. Levy, B.A., Gong, Z., Hessels, S., Evans, M. A., & Jared, D. (2006). Understanding print: Early reading development and the contributions of home literacy. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 93(1), 63-93. McCardle, P., & Chabra, V. (2004). The voice of evidence in reading research. Paul Brooks Publishing Co. Morrison, F. T., Bachman, H. J. & Connor, C. M. (2005). Improving literacy in America: Guidelines from research (Vol. 1). New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Neuman, S Rashia, F. L., Morris, R.D., & Sevcik, R.A. (2005). Relationship between home literacy environments and reading achievement in children with reading disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 38 (1), 2-11 Roberts, J., Jurgens, J., & Burchinal, M Saint-Laurent, L., & Giasson, J. (2005). Effects of a family literacy program adapting parental intervention to first graders ' evolution of reading and writing abilities. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 5(3), 253-278 Sawyer, W Slegers, B. (1996). A review of the research and literature on emergent literacy. Teale, W. H. (1995). Young children and reading: Trends across the twentieth century. Journal of Education, 177(3), 95-127. Weigel, D. J., Martin, S. S., & Bennett, K. K. (2006). Contributions of the home literacy environment to preschool-aged children 's emerging literacy and language skills. Early Child Development and Care, 176(3), 357-378.

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