Paradise Lost and Tis Pity

Topics: Garden of Eden, Adam and Eve, Paradise Lost Pages: 3 (1023 words) Published: May 17, 2014
1 - 'Language has the ability to make sin look attractive' Tis Pity was published by John Ford in 1633 and is set in Italy, the heart of the Renassiance. John Milton published Paradise Lost in 1667, relatively soon after John Ford, and was the first epic poem to be written in blank verse. Both writers push the boundaries of literature by exploring untouched, taboo subjects: incest and The Fall of Man. During this period of time, soon after the Renassiance period, many artists and writers were challenging society by introducing a range of different styles and genres. This meant that Ford and Milton both intended to tempt controversy through their pieces of literature; yet, the seductive choice of language has instead caused an attractiveness to both texts. It is this attraction to the language, and utter skill behind these writer's intentions, that has enabled both texts to withstand the test of time. In Book Nine of Paradise Lost, Milton begins to introduce Satan as the Serpent; however, he manages to draw the audience away from Satan's intentions by presenting his physical beauty. As the Serpent 'Addressed his way' towards Eve, with the desire to cause corruption, he moves 'not with intended wave'. Instead, he towers 'fould above fould a surging Maze', with the colours of 'Verdant Gold'. By giving the Serpent distinct characteristics, he is separating him from the other creatures in the Garden of Eden, therefore drawing Eve's attention to his uniqueness. The repetition of 'fould above fould' gives the sense of an illusion, something which Eve's eyesight is unable to comprehend; which is then reinforced by 'surging Maze', giving this illusion speed and power, causing a greater confusion on Eve's behalf. The vivid description of 'verdant Gold' gives the Serpent a very rich colouring, thus reiterating his importance in the Garden. When Satan finally decides to confront Eve, he becomes 'erect', giving himself a sense of empowerment. This is when Milton's...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Paradise Lost Essay
  • Paradise Lost Essay
  • Paradise Lost Essay
  • Paradise Lost Essay
  • Essay about Paradise Lost
  • Paradise Lost Essay
  • Essay about Paradise Lost
  • Paradise Lost Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free