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Do you agree that the article 15th of the constitution is necessary in order to reach fast development?

In Sri Lanka the base rule of Sri Lanka is the 1978 The Constitution of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka . This has the full administrative power to rule all the citizens who are coming under this constitution. This constitution has many articles and amendments in our constitution. According to that the 15th article is talking about THE SECURITY OF FUNDAMERMENTAL RIGHTS of Sri Lanka. Each country of the world they have this fundamental rights to make their citizens happy and to tell their opinions.

In our country we too have the same FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS SECURITY in the ARTICLE 15. This has many sub sections. These all say what are the rights the citizen have or doesn’t have. This helps to a citizen and make the solution for a problem to take correct and non-effected solutions. The article 15 of our constitution is -

15. (1) The exercise and operation of the fundamental rights declared and recognized by Articles 13(5) and 13(6) shall be subject only to such restrictions as may be prescribed by law in the interests of national security. For the purposes of this paragraph "law" includes regulations made under the law for the time being relating to public security.

2) The exercise and operation of the fundamental right declared and recognized by Article 14(1)(a) shall be subject to such restrictions as may be prescribed by law in the interests of racial and religious harmony or in relation to arliamentary privilege, contempt of court, defamation or incitement to an offence.

(3) The exercise and operation of the fundamental right declared and recognized by Article 14(1)(b) shall be subject to such restrictions as may be prescribed by law in the interests of racial and religious harmony.

(4) The exercise and operation of the fundamental right declared and recognized by Article 14(1)(c) shall be subject to such restrictions as may

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