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Pan's Labyrinth Film Analysis

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Pan's Labyrinth Film Analysis
Not only do Soviet Montage, German expressionism, and French impressionism influence nearly every film we see today, it also molds and builds the appearance of films and help to evoke emotion from the intended audience. Montage can best be described as the selecting, editing, or piecing together of film to create some type of meaning, this is seen in some way, shape, or form, in every film. German expressionism is seen as a movement towards distorted settings, along with supernatural stories. Expressionism in simplest terms was, what the audience saw, was how they were feeling about the events or characters. Lastly, French impressionism movement had a huge affect on film including: naturalistic acting, dream sequences, artistic camera use, …show more content…
Analysis into two films, Pan’s Labyrinth and Run Lola, Run, both display the influence these three concepts have on modern film. Pan’s Labyrinth contains many intricate and underlying concepts that are conveyed through its artistic characteristics and ability to tug on the emotional strings of the audience. Montage can be observed one way or another in almost any film due to the fact that most films are …show more content…
Montage is the most crucial step to appearance and quality of the overall movie. The montage presented in this film is expressed as one incident is intertwined with the characters dialogue. It is clear that the scenes fall on places as dialogues are said at the same rate. The editing of the film and the timing and placement of the scenes and shots is really what made this movie so outstanding. The editing led to a clearer understanding of the viewers in regards to theme, characters, and plot in the film. Expressionism is seen through mise en scène because it is based in reality. The lighting appears realistic, and Lola's clothes are dirty with a messy room. She also lacks good make up, and the locations are realistic. The realistic mise-en-scene puts the audience in the same frame of thought as the characters, which increases tension to the scene and creates a connection the viewers have with the main characters about choice and consequence. In one scene in particular, there is a sense of sympathy for Manni knowing he is under pressure by an overbearing boss. But also a feeling of hopelessness is present knowing that the punishment for losing such a large amount of money will be much more tragic. In this scene, they are shown on the phone in color while past events are shown in black and white. The black and

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