Outline and Research Paper on Cheating/Plagarism

Topics: Academic dishonesty, Plagiarism, The New York Times Pages: 9 (2995 words) Published: July 23, 2013
Delgado i

Take the Easy Way Now, Face Consequences Later

Thesis Statement: Students and writers who have become more accustomed to cheating and plagiarizing forget the fact that what they are doing is unacceptable, are deteriorating their ability to do their own work, and must face severe punishments. I. Extensive amount of students cheating and plagiarizing

A. Common cheating and plagiarizing
B. Students not aware of wrongness
C. Easier academic dishonesty
II. Copying work becomes habit
A. Copying not frowned upon
B. Occurs in workplace
III. Guidelines established to regulate academic dishonesty A. Preventing copying
B. Disciplinary actions
IV. Refutation
Concluding statement: In the long run, putting hard work in and submitting a composition in its entirety with your own interpretation and honesty will serve as an advantage over those who are more informal and resort to imitation.

Take the Easy Way Now, Face Consequences Later

Pedro Delgado
Enc1101
Prof. Eckhous
11/27/12

Delgado 1
Take the Easy Way Now, Face Consequences Later

In life, the only way to fully achieve expertise and benefit in a certain interest is to work for it. No matter what that subject may be a person is going to have to apply himself in order to prevail. Unfortunately, not all humans have developed a work ethic where they can manage tasks given to them with ease and decide that they need a little extra help. Thus, enhancing their performance, which becomes unfair to those who actually have dedicated themselves to their responsibilities and roles. This issue can mainly be seen in educational systems, where students are regularly cheating and helping each other, and even in the workplace, at which point writers plagiarize others when writing their stories. In 2003, Robin Gregg, a former writer for the New York Post, plagiarized work from The National Enquirer and used it in his article in the May 15 edition of the Post (“N.Y. Post”). The only reason why people do this is because they are too lazy to even come up with their own thoughts and ideas and instead try to steal someone else’s. Students and writers have become more accustomed to cheating and plagiarizing that they forget the fact that what they are doing is unacceptable, are deteriorating their ability to do their own work, and must face severe punishments.

Without a doubt, cheating has been in the world since the beginning of time and will continue until serious measures are taken and all students are held responsible for their actions. At the moment, the percentage of students who have been involved in cheating or plagiarizing has never been higher and is worrying professors. In surveys conducted from 2006 to 2010 by Donald L. McCabe, a business professor at Rutgers University in New Jersey, out of 14,000 students, 40 percent admitted to plagiarizing a few sentences in written assignments, and 61 percent admitted to Delgado 2

cheating on assignments and exams (Gabriel). Which means that more than half of these students were either helping each other with their work or took credit for something they shouldn’t have. Early in September this year at Harvard, about 125 students from a 279-person Government class were being investigated for cheating on a take-home final exam (Pennington). This shows that even in some of the most prestigious schools in the nation, incidents involving students cheating are not rare and need to be snuffed out by school officials. But beyond the educational system, in the working world there are instances where an employer may resort to stealing another worker’s information or even make up their own facts. After being promoted to the national desk for the New York Times in 2002, Jayson Blair had fabricated material in 36 of the 73 articles he had written since he was transferred to that seat in October (“New York”). When one needs to meet...


Cited: Baker, Al. “SCHOOLBOOK; Interim Principle named for Stuyvesant High School as Cheating Inquiry Unfolds.” NY Times. The New York Times. 7 Aug. 2012. Web. 19. Sep. 2012.
Gabriel, Trip. “Generation Plagiarism.” The New York Times Upfront. 25 Oct. 2010. Scholastic. Web. 19 Sep. 2012 .
Gabriel, Trip. “Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age.” NY Times. The New York Times. 1 Aug. 2012. Web. 19. Sep. 2012.
Leung, Rebecca. “Stephen Glass: I Lied For Esteem.” CBSNEWS. CBS. 11 Feb. 2009. Web. 22 Nov. 2012
“N.Y
“New York Times: Reporter routinely faked articles.” CNN U.S. CNN 11 May. 2003. Web. 22 Nov. 2012
Pennington, Bill
Perez-Peña, Richard. “Studies Find More Students Cheating, With High Achievers No Exception.” NY Times. The New York Times. 7 Sep. 2012. Web. 19. Sep. 2012.
Ratzlaff, Don. “Local educators enlist digital tool to battle digital plagiarism” Hillsboro Free Press. Hillsboro Free Press. 20 Nov. 2012 Web. 22 Nov. 2012
Slobogin, Kathy
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