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Othello act 6 (imaginary)

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OTHELLO ACT VI

(Othello and Desdemona return from the dead to the afterlife)
Othello: Oh my dear Desdemona, how could I be so blind, hath that villainous serpent, Iago to plant the seed of doubt within. You and I could be together, alive and well!
Desdemona: silence, my love. I trusted you, I had faith in you and I was true as my love with you. But love you, I can no longer.
Otherllo: NO!! prithee please, I need you, I lust for you, you alone, are all I need.
(THE DEVIL appears from hiding)
Devil: all you need you say?
Othello: by heaven. What foul being art thou?
Devil: by hell. Thou should say.
Othello: egads! Thou art the devil!
Devil: indeed, and you Othello, I believe we have to trade our wares now, come along, we don’t have all day.
Othello: NO, halt! What of Desdemona?
Devil: she was no quarrel with me, her deeds are of innocence and pure intent, she with heaven, and you with hell.
Othello: alas! I cannot be apart from my love. I must be with her and she with me.
Devil: all right, a challenge if you will. If she can return your affection within the next lunar cycle, then to her I release you. If you fail then to me your soul shall remain. Oh, on the offside, your tongue for the purpose of this challenge is MINE.

Othello: (Zounds) how to portray my love without speech!
(Iago appears)
Iago: how now, my most humble buffoon, what ails you?
Othello: you, I have no words to express the rage I suppress.
Iago: then speak no more. The deed is done, your life is in shambles. I’ve had my fun.
Othello: wretched dog!
(Othello strikes Iago)
Iago: (draws sword) how foul the mind’s occupation to strike one’s own apparition!
(Iago disappears)
(enter Cassio)
Cassio: Oh, how the fates turn in ways most obscure to see damned Othello alone, insecure.
Othello: cassio!
Cassio: no longer shall we converse like mortal men, I have your rank, remember?
Othello: rank? How dare you speak of rank in such ways. Tis you who is my lieutenant, always and forever.
Cassio: and tis you who is dead, always and forever.
Othello: zounds! What be thought purpose foul apparition to make jipes of the mad moor? To amuse your wretchedness with my rank.
Cassio: I come to converse and simply that.
Iago: as do i.
Othello: what? Not you again.
Iago: I hear your speech loud and clear. But shall Desdemona?
Cassio: I do not believe so, his tongue is be witched by the devil, there is no solution to this.
Othello: how now to love without my speech!
Cassio: tis a lesson we mean to teach, I’ll do it for the love I bear to you and your wife.
Iago: I’ll do it for the joy of your further ruining your life.
Othello: then it is agreed for now, I am yours to lead.
(enter Desdemona and Emilia)
Desdemona: oh emilia, could it be?
Emilia: yes my mistress. Tis I yours truly.
Desdemona: how I missed you so, If I could so take back the cruel sands of time, I would do so, im so sorry. (sobs)
Emilia: cry not, Desdemona. Twas the sons of Adam, our husbands, who used us as they saw fit.
Desdemona: what shall we do now? In life we live to serve our brides, but in death what better than to stand idle, till the very ground on which we stand turns to dust and us with it?
Emilia: to turn to dust, would take sooner than to please my other, I say we enjoy ourselves as women free from their shackles.
Desdemona: but what of Othello, iago, even surely no mortal soul should spend a life in the devil’s domain. Never would I bring my worst enemy to the infernal gate.
Emilia: Othello deserves what fate had dealth to him and all his villainy, let the scourge of women burn like charcoal that his complexion doth match, as far Iago, I believe that the sooner he returns to plane he was conceived the better for us all.
Desdemona: how could you say such a thing! You loved him.
Emilia: as did he, who knew that impaling your partner wasn’t a sign of affection.
(Enter cassio, iago , Othello, exit Emilia, Desdemona.)
Othello: we must hurry, time is almost up, and Desdemona awaits. Iago, are you certain that she will return my affection through the act of kissing her arse?
Iago: heaven’s no fool, what ridiculous tale did you imagine such an act?
Othello: (zounds) are you certain you are here to lend aid?
Iago: (thinks for a bit) no.
Othello: Cassio!
Cassio: well, do what your heart requests. If she firmly love thou, like thout thinks’t, then words are wind and actions be like that glass that reveal the heart.
Othello: but what action mirrors that of true love?
Cassio: but a kiss!
Othello: indeed, it is agreed. Heavens she approaches.
(enter Desdemona and Emilia)
Othello: desde----
(cassio covers his mouth)
Aside cassio: oh the poor moor forgets the deal he made, a second chance for his tongue was the trade.
Desdemona: Othello, what is it? Have you come to bid me farewell?
Othello: (shakes his head and signals to come close)
Desdemona: (nears)
Emilia: (grabs desdemona’s arm) wait my mistress, this seems rather odd, he speaks without speech, I mistrust these actions.
Desdemona: dear Othello, speak prithee, I wish to your voice one last time.
Othello: (Othello attempts a kiss)
Desdemona: how now Othello, unhold me prithee please!
Iago: (snickers)
Cassio: (whispers to Othello) my lord, perhaps a more subtle approach.
Othello (aside): zounds. She does not reflect my actions as planned.
Othello (kisses Emilia desperately)
(Emilia stunned) (Desdemona in shock)
Desdemona: Othello, why! My love, you could you would the heart that remained bound to yours!?
(devil appears)
Devil: congratulations! Your sol is saved, to heaven with you go, the path is paved.

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