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Origins of Democracy

Topics: Democracy, Representative democracy, Government / Pages: 5 (1097 words) / Published: Feb 11th, 2014
Origins of Democracy Democracy refers to a type of political system in which the people, or people they elect to be representatives, govern themselves, rather than being governed by a dictatorship or monarch. It is supposedly said that the democratic form of government began in Ancient Athens in 508 BC, but this form of government may have existed well before the turn of the 5th century. It is logical to assume that democracy, no matter how quaint or complex, began with the tribes. As having appeared first in the city of Athens, the source of its beginning had to have been from Athens as well. Cleinsthenes was known as the “Father of Athenian Democracy,” which soon became a form of direct democracy. This form of democracy involved having random selections of citizens to executive, legislature, and judicial positions. According to my research, Mesopotamia was the first country to use the traditional forms of Democracy in their culture’s government. The spread of this democracy grew rapidly going into areas such as Athens, all of Greece, and more of modern day Europe. This system of government was first recorded in 2,500 BC in Mesopotamia. In 550 BC, it was noticed in Athens. Cleinsthenes was considered to be the” Father of Athenian Democracy” because of his application of the term, yet all research points to it being first declared in Mesopotamia. Alliances of democratic governments came together in assembly, as proposed by the Arcadians during 360 BC. From around the tenth century BC, democracy entered a second historical phase whose main focus was Europe. Shaped by forces that were wide in range from the rise of the first parliaments to the conflicts created by self-governing councils, democracy came to be understood as representative democracy. A representative democracy is a form of democracy that is founded on elected officials chosen to govern a set of people. The powers of the representatives are extremely limited, stating that a democracy gives power to the people. After representative democracy took hold of nations until around the mid-twentieth century, it took its fall. At the end of its phase, people began to fill that this entitlement of suffrage was universal, not just men. The women began to want that right and pushed to get it. Assumingly, the government fought back and claimed defeat to say that no form of government has its “historical guarantees.” Out of representative democracy came an era of “complex democracy.” Complex democracy redefined the term “created as equals.” It stated that no matter what nationality, race, culture, civilization, language, or skin color, you would have equal rights as people of democracy. Racial prejudice was extracted from this form of government. Their institutions and foundations are being stretched into areas of life that they had little to no significance in through past government systems. Representative government cannot just simply disappear. It can thrive and has thrived in other societies, but with the stress of public concerns and pressures, people want equality. Sadly, soon this age of government begins to become plagued with social inequality. Government membership was slowly depleting. All systems of government are being troubled by the “multi-cultural” societies and how they will never be able to please everyone. In parenthetical thought, people have begun to see the world as ever changing and cannot stop it; so instead, they try and change the way they are living and what is governing them. New threats greatly outweigh the power of the complex democracy, and we begin to wonder if democracy has a strong future like it had in 550 BC. The question is, will democracy continue to evolve? The nineteenth-century American poet and writer, Walt Whitman stated,” The history of democracy cannot be written because democracy as I and others know, was not yet properly built.” The future of democracy cannot be determined. However, as we all know, religion, business practices, attitudes, accomplishments, culture, language, influences, and life will continue to change, making it close to impossible for democracy not to change—whether for the best, or the worst. In my opinion, democracy is not the way to go about governing people. Democracy allows people to make the rules, especially if it benefits them. They don’t take into consideration the effect it has on everyone else. I believe a Republican form of government is the greatest way to go about representing a body of people—while keeping the fundamentals pure, and also just. Democracy gives the people too much power and control to maintain a morally sane culture. If I had a chance to change the democratic form of government, I would start with the fundamentals. Most democracies you find today are finding ways to go around, over, and through the original documents that helped establish those parts of the world. For example, the U.S. democracy is beginning to write off the constitution and take away some of our freedom as people. The rich are getting money taking from them to help pay for those who won’t work for it. The foundation of this system is flawed tremendously. I would make it where the fundamentals kept our basic freedoms as individuals, while incorporating those beliefs of the bible and the constitution. Think about it! How amazing would it be if we could live in a society where God came first above jobs, money, greed, and popularity? Everything would work out for the good. Next, I would begin establishing laws that supported the new orders of this government. Some laws would help in the security of the people. For example, those who were tried for murder would be put to death if the penalty were to be guilty. Guns would be allowed, merely as basic rights of the people. Children would be permitted to go to school. Laws would be made according to the elected officials’ call, with the help of the branches of government—executive, legislative, and judicial. States could have their own governing officials, but would be prohibited to making laws and sanctions without governmental consultation—that has every right to overrule, if decided so. A Supreme Court would be a necessity, for the punishments and rewards of the laws. Drug use, and lack thereof, would be illegal and punishable by the law. Children will have the opportunity to receive teachings of religion in school. But lastly, above all else, every member in authority over the citizens would have a firm relationship with God. ” And we know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose.” –Romans 8:28

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