Organizational Ambidexterity: Antecedents, Outcomes, and Moderators

Topics: Innovation, Management, Organization Pages: 55 (15866 words) Published: June 18, 2013
Journal of Management
http://jom.sagepub.com Organizational Ambidexterity: Antecedents, Outcomes, and Moderators Sebastian Raisch and Julian Birkinshaw Journal of Management 2008; 34; 375 originally published online Mar 14, 2008; DOI: 10.1177/0149206308316058 The online version of this article can be found at: http://jom.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/34/3/375

Published by:
http://www.sagepublications.com

On behalf of:

Southern Management Association

Additional services and information for Journal of Management can be found at: Email Alerts: http://jom.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Subscriptions: http://jom.sagepub.com/subscriptions Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Permissions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Citations http://jom.sagepub.com/cgi/content/refs/34/3/375

Downloaded from http://jom.sagepub.com at London Business School on May 6, 2009

Organizational Ambidexterity: Antecedents, Outcomes, and Moderators† Sebastian Raisch*
University of St. Gallen, Institute of Management, Dufourstrasse 40a, 9000 St. Gallen, Switzerland

Julian Birkinshaw
London Business School, Sussex Place, Regents Park, London NW1 4SA, United Kingdom

Organizational ambidexterity, defined as an organization’s ability to be aligned and efficient in its management of today’s business demands while simultaneously being adaptive to changes in the environment, has gained increasing interest in recent years. In this article, the authors review various literature streams to develop a comprehensive model that covers research into the antecedents, moderators, and outcomes of organizational ambidexterity. They indicate gaps within and across different research domains and point to important avenues for future research. Keywords: ambidexterity; change; exploitation; exploration; innovation; learning

A persistent theme in a variety of organizational literatures is that successful firms are ambidextrous—aligned and efficient in their management of today’s business demands while simultaneously adaptive to changes in the environment (Duncan, 1976; Gibson & Birkinshaw, 2004; Tushman & O’Reilly, 1996). To be ambidextrous, organizations have to reconcile internal tensions and conflicting demands in their task environments. Whereas earlier studies often regarded these trade-offs as insurmountable, more recent research has presented a range of organizational solutions to support ambidexterity. Scholars first put forward different structural mechanisms to cope with the competing demands facing the organization (Adler, Goldoftas, &

†The authors would like to thank Keith D. Brouthers for his comments, which have been very helpful in developing this article. *Corresponding author: Tel: +41-71-224-2364 E-mail address: sebastian.raisch@unisg.ch Journal of Management, Vol. 34 No. 3, June 2008 375-409 DOI: 10.1177/0149206308316058 © 2008 Southern Management Association. All rights reserved.

375

Downloaded from http://jom.sagepub.com at London Business School on May 6, 2009

376

Journal of Management / June 2008

Levine, 1999; McDonough & Leifer, 1983; Tushman & O’Reilly, 1996). Conversely, Gibson and Birkinshaw (2004) proposed that ambidexterity arises from a business unit’s organizational context. Recently, scholars have started to investigate leadership characteristics that enable organizations to manage and embrace the contradictions that they face (Beckman, 2006; Lubatkin, Simsek, Ling, & Veiga, 2006; Smith & Tushman, 2005). Two factors motivated this synthesis of the research streams on organizational ambidexterity. First, with contributions coming from an increasing variety of research domains, the initially focused debate on organizational ambidexterity has become disconnected and complex. This has not only led to a lack of transparency in the vocabulary that is used but also, more critically, in respect of the different phenomena’s specific effects. The field would therefore benefit from a...

Citations: http://jom.sagepub.com/cgi/content/refs/34/3/375
Downloaded from http://jom.sagepub.com at London Business School on May 6, 2009
University of St. Gallen, Institute of Management, Dufourstrasse 40a, 9000 St. Gallen, Switzerland
Julian Birkinshaw
375
Downloaded from http://jom.sagepub.com at London Business School on May 6, 2009
Downloaded from http://jom.sagepub.com at London Business School on May 6, 2009
Raisch, Birkinshaw / Organizational Ambidexterity
Downloaded from http://jom.sagepub.com at London Business School on May 6, 2009
378
Downloaded from http://jom.sagepub.com at London Business School on May 6, 2009
Raisch, Birkinshaw / Organizational Ambidexterity
Downloaded from http://jom.sagepub.com at London Business School on May 6, 2009
380
Downloaded from http://jom.sagepub.com at London Business School on May 6, 2009
Raisch, Birkinshaw / Organizational Ambidexterity
Downloaded from http://jom.sagepub.com at London Business School on May 6, 2009
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Organizational Essay
  • Essay on Organizational Change
  • organizational Essay
  • organizational behaviour Essay
  • organizational psychology Essay
  • Organizational Behavior Analysis Essay
  • Antecedents Word Essay
  • Learning Outcomes Research Paper

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free