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Section 2.1: Becoming Familiar with Relevant Aspects of Students’ Backgrounds Knowledge and Experiences
This section talks about becoming familiar with students' background knowledge and their experiences.

Describes how to locate learner background information and experiences; explains how it can be used in planning lessons

Locating learner background information and experiences is important. I could locate my students’ background information by looking at their transcripts, interviewing them, or even looking at their previous test scores from years past. By looking at my future students' previous tests, I'm able to see what they know and what level of learning they are at. This will help me in my classroom because I'm then able to create lesson plans around my students’ capabilities of learning. For example, if a large percentage of my students didn't do well on the reading portion of their OAA test, I can make sure I put more time into my reading lessons to meet the needs of my students. Locating my students' experiences is important too. I can do this by doing a getting to know you activity in the beginning of the year. As you can see by the attached evidence, this was the getting to know you activity my teacher in my Teaching Professions class did on the first day of school. I had to pick 5 things about must to talk about and 1 of them had to be a lie. Then my classmates had to guess which one I was lying about. This was good because right off the bat, my classmates and teacher knew a couple things about me. I will use this in my future classroom but instead of picking one that is a lie, I will have my students’ pick 3 that are true and 2 that are not true to make it more interesting. This will be helpful in my classroom because it will give me a better understanding of who my students are and what their lives are like outside of the school setting. I'm considering teaching in an inner city/poor area. Let's say the majority of my students have never been to a basketball game. I can incorporate their life experience with a lesson. I could take my students to a basketball game and also be able to incorporate a science lesson out of it. The students would have to find the mass of the ball and the velocity it travels at, etc. With this idea, I'm able to incorporate something my students have never experienced, due to living in poor conditions, and also teach them, too. By becoming familiar with my students background knowledge and experiences, I'm able to be more equipped to meeting their needs in the classroom.
Examines the implications of diversity in planning lessons (cultural/religious/ethnic/ability/gender differences

It is important to pay attention to diversity in the classroom. When planning lessons, I will pay attention to the different religious beliefs, ethnic backgrounds, abilities, and gender differences in my classroom. Not every child will have the same beliefs/understanding of things. Every student is different. It’s important to know the differences in the students’ because then I will be more understanding of their background on who they are and I will able to teach my lessons respecting each of my students’ beliefs. In my field experience, my mentor addressed the Christmas break as “Holiday break”. I found this interesting because she was respecting those who don’t celebrate Christmas in her class by addressing the break as a “Holiday break.” By doing this, the students’ understood that not every person in their class celebrates Christmas. This gives the students’ a new found respect for each other, understanding that everyone is different. Not every student in their class had the same beliefs. I think it’s important for all of the students’ in the class to understand their classmates’ beliefs/background. Harry Wong says “However, because of activists like Rosa Parks, today the only person who can legally discriminate against you is yourself.” (Wong 314) I love this quote because it can totally reflect on the classroom setting. As stated before, every student is different and should be treated with respect. It’s important to know my students’ backgrounds and beliefs so that when I plan my lessons, I’m able to teach what needs to be taught while still respecting each and every one of my students. My students will not be discriminated against for who they are or what they believe. I will do my best to establish rapport in my class between not only my students and I, but also the students with each other.

Differentiates student learning capabilities in planning lessons
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