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One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest Essay

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One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest Essay
Psy 3055 Maria Kuzinets

Milos Forman’s One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest examines the lives of several patients at Oregon State Hospital in the 1950s towards the end of deinstitutionalization movement the U.S. Ive chosen to explore the character of Chief Bromden, a chronic patient diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia in the film. The institutional processes of 1950s mental hospitals that may have created dependency, hopelessness, learned helplessness, and other maladaptive behaviors. This is strongly exhibited in the film, through nurse Ratched’s cold, dominating manner of running of the ward.

In the film Chief’s character is written off as deaf & dumb by both the staff and other patients, he often appears catatonic.
…show more content…
A clinician would also pickup on less obvious symptoms like Bromden’s social isolation & withdrawal as well as unusual speech, thinking behavior problems (in this case voluntary lack of speech). They would also need to determine whether Bromden’s prolonged depressed mood is a symptom of schizophrenia or one of major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder.

Psychosocial treatments would include: rehabilitation, individual psychotherapy, family education, self help & support groups and antipsychotic drugs. Social and vocational training would be administered early on after the antipsychotic medication has been administered. As it deals with the immediate issues of isolation and helps teach the individual how to readjust to life outside of the sheltered/controlled environment of a hospital setting, rehabilitation would be an integral step in eventually returning to life in the outside

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