Preview

Omnivore's Dilemma Summary

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
266 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Omnivore's Dilemma Summary
Michael Pollan’s purpose for writing this book was to inform the reader of the Omnivore’s Dilemma, the secrets behind what we eat. As omnivores, we humans have the a dilemma about our food, where it comes and what it comes from. Pollan informs the reader this because many people in America and around the world do not know where our food that we ingest comes from. After Pollan discovers himself the lies and truths of what actually happens through the process of our food, he shares the knowledge and information to many more in this memorable book. “I had to go back to the beginning, to the farms and fields where our food is grown. Then I followed it each step of the way, and watched what happened to our food on its way stomachs”(1.4) In chapter

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    We, as humans, have developed such a bizarre and uncomfortable relationship with non-human animals. In her short essay, Makenna Goodman describes how for dinner she had her guests come over and one had to kill a chicken for their meal. Goodman also discusses the efforts made by farmers to supply their families with farm-fresh food that has been prepared in an ethical way. Goodman introduces her article by sharing with us about her own life as a farmer and how it explains her opinion about killing what we eat. Indeed, for some people, the connection to the food that we eat is vital and offers explications on the backstory of what we consume.…

    • 729 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The omnivore’s dilemma is a clever twist on a dilemma we face each day. What should we have for dinner? Since humans are omnivores, they can eat whatever they please. All of the things that people could eat have the potential to affect both the individual and our world. Having to take into account these implications is where the dilemma arises. The omnivore’s dilemma is that the choices we make regarding food have consequences. In my personal life the question “what should I have for dinner,” comes up a good amount of time. Although this is a popular question in daily life, I have yet to question how what I eat affects the world. We all ponder whether or not to eat that unhealthy pizza, but how does this effect the world? The main question Pollan raises can be resolved through cultural influences.…

    • 532 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    In almost every culture, one of the most cherished pass times is food. We eat to sustain or health, to celebrate, to morn, and sometimes just to do it. Yet, how often do we question were that food comes from? Most everyone purchases their meals from the grocery store or at a restaurant but have you ever wondered where that juicy steak grazed? How about how those crisp vegetables? Where were those grown? The Omnivore 's Dilemma, by Michael Pollan, analyzes the eating habits and food chains of modern America in an attempt to bring readers closer to the origin of their foods. Not only where it comes from, but where it all begins, as well as what it takes to keep all of those plants and animals in production. In part two of the Omnivore’s Dilemma: Pastoral: Grass, Pollan gives background on what all produce and livestock need to be the best it can be. As simple as it may sound, it starts with the grass. Yet, Pollan makes it very clear it’s not always as simple as it sounds. After starting The Omnivore’s Dilemma I had a few expectations. Firstly, I enjoy a blend of humor and philosophy; I want what I read to make me think, for the words to flow nicely from one completely thought to the next, and for the overall of the chapters to hold my attention.…

    • 1316 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    The structure of Pollan’s article is a strategy he employs very well, because the organization of each part flows nicely into the next. Pollan’s main claim suggests that changes in the policies that govern our food system, which have corrupted American health and social well being, are far overdue. Pollan’s solution requires removing the industrial giants out of the farms and giving power back to smaller farms and local government.…

    • 1792 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    In Defense of Food

    • 1216 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Pollan, Michael. In Defense of Food: An Eater 's Manifesto. New York: Penguin, 2008. Print.…

    • 1216 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Western diet has made it impossible for society to gain power in choosing a alternative diet that can provide the the source of nourishment that netizens need. In creating plans of boosting carbohydrates with antioxidants, probiotics, and omega-3s it has led to diagnoses of severe illnesses. Which the medical community has gained new products and procedures from the effect of the Western diet. Although, the society can’t afford to buy whole food due to its high price, spend time in preparing food that are low in fat rather than buying processed meals and fast foods filled with chemicals. Your ideal of a healthy diet will reflect the people around you. They way you eat is the way your family will eat. Choose a life that you and your family can benefit. In conclusion, Pollan strongly argued his disgust in the damage the food industry has created and caused to the…

    • 824 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    In Slaughterhouse Blues, anthropologist Donald Stull and social geographer Michael Broadway explore the advent, history, and implications of modern food production. The industrialized system behind what we eat is one of the most controversial points of political interest in our society today. Progressions in productive, logistical, retail, and even biological technologies have made mass produced foods more available and more affordable than ever before. This being said, the vague mass production of ever-available cheap “food” carries with it several hidden costs that the consumer is left to be blatantly unaware of. These costs, namely stress and abuse of the environment, diminished regard for animal welfare, the glorification and prevalence of diets full of sugar and fat, and an increased susceptibility to the spread and contraction of food-borne and nutritional illnesses. Food is a necessity, on both the level of its physical value to our bodies and the level of its monetary value as a commodity. With this in mind, the question then comes to mind as whether or not “cheaper and quicker” is really better for us if the reduction in time and effort also comes with a reduction in quality.…

    • 1588 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The majority of what you will find in this book is more so about what has happened to create this food crisis, and less in detail about what specific foods you should be eating to acquire health. Pollan claims that we have made things much more complicated than needed, and we should be eating real earth-grown food, not food products. Nutritionists have decided to focus on eating nutrients and mass-producing many food products with several claims about how these products are good for you. In reality, we should be buying less cheap products, and in contrast, a minimal amount of healthy fruits and vegetables; mostly plants. Interestingly enough, the foods that are supposed to help us lose weight have been the culprit of what has made us gain more. (45) We have tried to break down the idea of what food is and make it ourselves, however the pieces and parts of what makes food what it is, is too complex for humans to try to understand. Perhaps understanding food is as simple as, eat what is real. There is no need to further contemplate what it is made of unless it has come from a place that is not the earth.…

    • 1397 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Maxfield starts off by talking about all of the things that Michael Pollan writes about to help inform his readers about becoming healthier and what their problems are. Maxfield talks about how Pollan says that the food industry and also nutrition science is really confusing people on how to eat properly. She states how Pollan has his own theories and makes his own assumptions about health, diets, and weight that all follow the food industry that he critiques. Maxfield also talks about Pollan’s theory of “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants,” she explains how Pollan is using this because he does not believe people are capable of properly nourishing themselves.…

    • 732 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In Michael Pollan’s essay “Escape from the Western Diet,” he informs Americans about the western diet and believes they need to escape from it. The reason Americans should escape the western diet is to avoid the harmful effects associated with it such as “western diseases” (Pollan, 434). To support his view on the issue, Pollan describes factors of the western diet that dictate what Americans believe they should eat. These factors include scientists with their theories of nutritionism, the food industry supporting the theories by making products, and the health industry making medication to support those same theories. Overall, Pollan feels that in order to escape this diet, people need to get the idea of it out of their heads. In turn he provides his own rules for escaping the western diet as well as the idea of nutritionism set forth by scientists.…

    • 743 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In Michael Pollan’s, The Omnivores Dilemma everything we eat is somehow derived from corn. Dating back to the day of the Mayans when they were sometimes referred to as “the corn people” (Pollan 19). Pollan takes us back to the “beginning” of the industrial food chain. In The Omnivores Dilemma historical context, ideology, and setting do not do the reader justice in opening their eyes to the harsh reality that without the corn industry eating as we know it today would cease to exist.…

    • 684 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Omnivore's Dilemma

    • 687 Words
    • 3 Pages

    I myself tend to be keen to understand how the world around me functions. I am passionate about all knowledge regardless of topic and prior to reading Pollan’s piece, I had a firm understanding of what we ate and how it was linked economically to major corporations. Cutting down on costs was and always will be every food company’s number one priority.…

    • 687 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Health problems are flooding America. Why? It is the unhealthy, toxic food that we are consuming every day, everywhere. To change America's path on health and food, we have to fix how we eat and know where our food come from. In the novel, The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan, the reality of our food is dived into. Pollan takes us on a journey where he explores the four food chains. Those four food chains that control America’s food consist of, Industrial, Industrial organic, Local sustainable and Hunter-gatherer. Industrial is what you find in most supermarkets the “cheap”, and full of additives, preservatives, and antibiotic food. Additionally, there is Industrial organic. This food chain is a bit healthier than it's partner Industrial,…

    • 1609 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The book “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” by Michael Pollan is a book that breaks down where different foods really come from, what they are made of, and the people who spend their lives producing these products. I found myself putting this assignment off all week since it did not sound like a book that would interest me. The assignment was to review one of the three sections of the book and I chose part one: Industrial/Corn, where it is explained that corn is the main crop grown in America. Despite this, the book goes on to explain that farmers are in serious trouble. I anticipated a long, boring reading session where I would struggle to find the words to review this section because I was falling asleep through most of it. However, I was pleasantly surprised to find that the section was very informative and grabs the reader’s attention with interesting facts and shocking revelations that we do not normally think about when we go to the grocery store.…

    • 649 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Michael Pollan’s, The Omnivore’s Dilemma crosses paths with, “Fast Food Nation: The True Cost of America’s Diet.” Both works share similar ideas, themes, and lessons. “Fast Food Nation: The True Cost of America’s Diet” focuses on the average American diet, containing processed foods, fast foods, and more unhealthy products. Pollan, rather, wants to show the cycle from the farm to the food on the table.…

    • 614 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays