Preview

Omnivore's Dilemma Case Study

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
571 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Omnivore's Dilemma Case Study
Which do you think would be a more effective way to change people’s food choices: changing policy or informing the public about health benefits and environmental impacts? Why do you think so?
Omnivore’s Dilemma Essay Do you love steak? I am sorry to say but most of the beef products made in the United States have GMO’s in them. Whether you know or not, the cows in feedlots are fed GMO (Genetically Modified Organisms) corn. We need to change our country’s policy to make our food healthier for us and for the animals our meat is coming from.
We splice corn with fish genes to create this monstrosity of a food for families that don’t have enough money and for farmed animals. They wanted to have GMO’s called organic. Tests have proven that GMO foods have affected our health in many ways, from shortening our lifespan to heart disease. Yet, we still let these big industrial farms still run and feed these animals this monstrosity, it is ludicrous! We need to ban cross-species unhealthiness. GMO corn is spliced with fish genes, to create a “super corn”. Just banning GMO’s
…show more content…
After WWII, the government found itself with a tremendous surplus of ammonium nitrate. Ammonium nitrate is the main ingredient for fertilizer, and bombs. This fertilizers that big industrial farms use destroy the fertility of the soil and damage the root system setup by the plants around the area. They can also drain into rivers and wipe out a species. DDT, that pesticide almost wiped out the Bald Eagle population. These pesticides and fertilizers have destroyed insects and nitrogen that help plants grow. Instead we use lab produced fertilizers to help the plants grow. These pesticides and fertilizers damage the ecosystems around them and our dangerous not just to plants and animals to but they are also damaging our environment. Pesticides and fertilizers are not the only thing that destroy soil fertility and the ecosystem around

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    One does not necessarily expect books about food also to be about bigger ideas like oppression, spirituality, and freedom, yet Pollan defies expectations. Pollan begins with an exploration of the food-production system from which the vast majority of American meals are derived. This industrial food chain is mainly based on corn, whether it is eaten directly, fed to livestock, or processed into chemicals such as glucose and ethanol. Pollan discusses how the humble corn plant came to dominate the American diet through a combination of biological, cultural, and political factors. The role of petroleum in the cultivation and transportation the American food supply is also discussed. A fast-food meal is used to illustrate the end result of the industrial food chain.…

    • 615 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Omnivore’s Dilemma

    • 560 Words
    • 3 Pages

    I had certainly never looked at organic food this way. I grew up eating regular food.. I saw no “rich narrative,” no “well-composted soils on small farms,” and no heroes or villains. Nor did I see any reason to be surprised (as Pollan was) by a microwaveable organic TV dinner. That’s not to say that I was born with a detailed understanding of the workings of organic farming. I knew next to nothing about farming, but I never saw any reason to fill in the blanks with these kinds of stories.I suspect that Pollan is right that Whole Foods would like us to think of these stories. Regardless, I’d venture to guess that he and I experience shopping at Whole Foods about as differently as two people might experience the same grocery store, given his fascination with stories and my own devout literalism. It really does open my eyes about organic food and be well educated about what we put in our bodies. I really think it benefits me a whole lot.…

    • 560 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    In almost every culture, one of the most cherished pass times is food. We eat to sustain or health, to celebrate, to morn, and sometimes just to do it. Yet, how often do we question were that food comes from? Most everyone purchases their meals from the grocery store or at a restaurant but have you ever wondered where that juicy steak grazed? How about how those crisp vegetables? Where were those grown? The Omnivore 's Dilemma, by Michael Pollan, analyzes the eating habits and food chains of modern America in an attempt to bring readers closer to the origin of their foods. Not only where it comes from, but where it all begins, as well as what it takes to keep all of those plants and animals in production. In part two of the Omnivore’s Dilemma: Pastoral: Grass, Pollan gives background on what all produce and livestock need to be the best it can be. As simple as it may sound, it starts with the grass. Yet, Pollan makes it very clear it’s not always as simple as it sounds. After starting The Omnivore’s Dilemma I had a few expectations. Firstly, I enjoy a blend of humor and philosophy; I want what I read to make me think, for the words to flow nicely from one completely thought to the next, and for the overall of the chapters to hold my attention.…

    • 1316 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Omnivore Dilemma

    • 420 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The Omnivores Dilemma by Michael Pollan , is separated into three different sections Corn, Grass, and the Forest . I choose the Grass section honestly because I felt no one would pick it and because it was long and I wanted to be different . I did not think that this book was going to be all impressive . I don’t know if I was judging a book by it cover I am not sure but my thought process was how could be interesting about a book that had a chapters labeled Grass. In this chapter Pollan talks about the controversy of the organic food and the role it plays in the food industry, as well as what is Grass farming .…

    • 420 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Omnivore’s Dilemma, by Michael Pollan, analyzes the eating habits and food chains of modern America in an attempt to bring readers closer to the origin of their foods. Pollan’s blend of humor and philosophical questions about the nature of food serves both to enlighten readers about the environment from which their food is harvested and to teach readers about alternative ways of eating.…

    • 649 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    “A number seven, no pickles, with a large sprite please. Oh, can we have some extra ketchup with that as well?” This answer may resemble something near how most people would respond to Pollans question, “What should we have for dinner?” posed at the beginning of his book, The Omnivores Dilemma. Pollan breaks his book down into three major components, the preface, the process, and the person. By clearly identifying what he is examining, and through firsthand experience, Pollan was able to discuss American diet, and all that goes along with it.…

    • 1624 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The book Omnivore’s Dilemma started off with a question like many other books do but this question is simple, what should we have for dinner tonight? But the answer is way more complicated than the just the simple question that is asked. In the book Omnivore’s Dilemma, Pollan examines humans eating problems and how food affects humans as a society also he is talking about food as cultural significant object and increasing food availability as a problem in our society. The Omnivore’s Dilemma is an fascinating book that will have Americans reevaluating their way of eating and choosing their food more carefully and actually looking at labels or how it is grown or raised. Pollan mainly focuses on examining the problem of our eating and by looking…

    • 904 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Michael Pollan in 2006, published a work that has to some degree changed the way that people eat, or at the very least attempted to change the way that we think about the food we eat. (Shea 54) Pollan demonstrates through fundamentally modern rhetoric the relationship that people, and more specifically American’s have with food and how very distant we are from it. ("History, Old Favorites in" B08) To some degree Pollan, others like him and internationally challenging food shortages and even worse food born illnesses and scares are changing the way that food is understood with regard to an international and national food traceability and accountability movement. (Popper 365) Pollan challenges the “industrial food chain” looking at ingredients, finished food products and other issues to try to source out the distance between man and his or her food. His investment in the idea goes much further as he explores through rhetoric several scenarios regarding obtaining and cooking meals. Those scenarios including attempting to show American’s a better way, or at least shock us out of our food stupor by first enjoying a meal from McDonalds (sourcing it almost exclusively to corn an overused and bizarre food product and petroleum products), producing a meal from a famous “organic” food retailer, challenging this niche industry. The third meal is a meal made from only items found on a utopian Virginian farm, and then Pollan produces a meal from only foraging. Through all these scenarios he explores, from a very basic standpoint, all the inaccuracies, misrepresentations and challenges that our food industry places on the ethic of living on the earth and sharing it with others.…

    • 2818 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Omnivore Dilemma

    • 371 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Michael Pollan’s argument is that the omnivore dilemma is a problem for us, and where our foods come from. Michael Pollan is trying to inform us about the healthy choices for our food diet. Some meals were organic or process meals but organic is healthier. People choice to eat whatever they want but it can also be difficult because there are thousands of foods to choose from. It starts with the vegetables, fruits, meat, and etc. The omnivore’s dilemma means someone who could eat varieties of foods to become healthy but eating anything could also be a problem. People could get over weight, high blood pressure, and etc.…

    • 371 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    According to my section of the novel, Personal, the universal topic does not coincide with every young American’s existence. The universal topic in the section Personal is how to hunt and kill for your own food and how to find the right fruits and fungi to eat in the wilderness. Most young americans don’t have to worry about any of this. Almost every piece of food is essentially handed to them. Hunting is a game to some of us, not a lifestyle or a necessity for life. The overall universal topic is how Omnivore’s obviously have a dilemma when it comes to choosing their own foods. Most young Americans can easily identify what kind of food they want for lunch or breakfast and sometimes they don’t even have a choice. For this reason, I disagree with with the statement that young Americans have trouble finding what they want to eat.…

    • 409 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Omnivores Dilemma

    • 5077 Words
    • 21 Pages

    Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: The Secrets Behind What You Eat (Young Reader’s Edition) - Grade 7…

    • 5077 Words
    • 21 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Omnivore’s Dilemma, by Michael Pollan, is a book that explains the roots of the food we eat. Pollan explores industrial farming, organic and sustainable agriculture, how foods get their sources from nature, and more. However, this book might not be as appealing to some readers as it does others. Did the book hold my interest? Was the book easy to read? Did it provide me with new knowledge? These were the questions I kept in mind while reading the first three chapters of this book. Mixed feelings surfaced.…

    • 559 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The book “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” by Michael Pollan is a book that breaks down where different foods really come from, what they are made of, and the people who spend their lives producing these products. I found myself putting this assignment off all week since it did not sound like a book that would interest me. The assignment was to review one of the three sections of the book and I chose part one: Industrial/Corn, where it is explained that corn is the main crop grown in America. Despite this, the book goes on to explain that farmers are in serious trouble. I anticipated a long, boring reading session where I would struggle to find the words to review this section because I was falling asleep through most of it. However, I was pleasantly surprised to find that the section was very informative and grabs the reader’s attention with interesting facts and shocking revelations that we do not normally think about when we go to the grocery store.…

    • 649 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    This week I read Omnivore's Dilemma: The secrets behind what you eat, a book by Michael Pollan. The book is about the types of food eating, making, and/or growing. There are four parts to the book: 1. Food from Corn, 2. Organic Industrial, 3. Food from Grass, and 4. Hunter Gatherer. The book shares what the saying “from farm to table” actually means.…

    • 435 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    How many times have you eaten something without reading the ingredients label? In 1982, Genetically Modified Organisms were approved for human use1 and eventually mass produced to the public as FLAVR SAVR Tomato in the late 1990s.2 Many may think that GMOs will end world hunger, but it is killing us rather than saving us. If food companies continue to advertise GMOs as the savior of America’s hunger problems, the country is in for a surprise. Any food product being sold to the general public should be removed and banned because GMOs contribute to the rise of illness, contaminate the plants in our organic farms, and humans were not made to play god.…

    • 713 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays