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Omnivore Dilemma

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Omnivore Dilemma
Grass
DeVry University

Grass
The Omnivores Dilemma by Michael Pollan , is separated into three different sections Corn, Grass, and the Forest . I choose the Grass section honestly because I felt no one would pick it and because it was long and I wanted to be different . I did not think that this book was going to be all impressive . I don’t know if I was judging a book by it cover I am not sure but my thought process was how could be interesting about a book that had a chapters labeled Grass. In this chapter Pollan talks about the controversy of the organic food and the role it plays in the food industry, as well as what is Grass farming . In the chapter Grass Pollan wants to find out about organic food , and that he did. He went to California to do research when he arrived to California didn’t find an organic farm he found a industrial farm labeled as an organic farm . The fact of the matter is the organic farms are not much different from industrial farms and Pollan proves this in this chapter. Places like Whole Foods try make us feel like we are getting our moneys worth by buying “organic" foods. I believe it is because their products are suppose to be free range and they are not . Pollan bought a few items in the section My Organic Industrial Meal, I believe he did this to do a basic break down on what is and is truly not organic. this section was truly an eye opener for the mere fact that these companies give the consumer false impressions on what organic food really is . The term Grass farming was very new to me, it is a term used by a farmer Joel Salatin. He uses this term because his chicken eats the grass and does not eat corn. Joel Salatin states on (Pollan pg 127) “Birds follow and clean up after herbivores.” And so during their turn in the pasture, the hens had performed several ecological services for the cattle as well as the grass: They’d picked the tasty grubs and fly larvae out of the cowpats, in the process spreading the

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