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Omnivore Diet Benefits

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Omnivore Diet Benefits
Standard American Diet (SAD): Defining the Benefits of the Organic Omnivore Diet and Free-Range Animal Ethics

This dietary study will define the importance of an organic omnivore diet, which will include a balanced ratio of meat, vegetables, and fish as part of quality food intake. In today’s industrialized food industry, it is very difficult to find good quality food that has not been processed or manipulated in terms of bulk production. More so, animals are treated inhumanely by placing them in cages or brutally killing them in a meatpacking factory. For instance, many ethical concerns about the treatment of animals in these brutal conditions is part of my choice to only eat “free-range” animals that live on small organic farms. Pollan
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Industrial farming often uses many harmful pesticides to process large amounts of food, but it also poisons the food in the process: “There certainly is a justifiable concern that some chemicals have increased toxicity and are potentially harmful” (Fuhrman 300). In this manner, I find it to be a healthier dietary choice to avoid these harmful chemicals in my food, which I can typically find at a pesticide free organic farm in the local area. I often purchase my groceries at food co-ops and other health food stores in the local area. Also, I will only buy “free-range” meat, which explicitly defines that the animals I am eating have been raised, processed, and slaughtered at local farms. Free-range animals also tend to be grass fed, which reduces contamination of meat that is often produced by corn-fed industrial meat producers. Industrial meat is often treated and cleaned with toxic chemicals, which I choose to avoid by purchasing free-range meat products. Organic grocery stores are my primary source of food, since they provide naturally processed foods that will provide the maximum nutrition and chemical-free food …show more content…
Industrial farmers appear to be more concerned with massive profit margins, than they do with producing quality food in providing meat and vegetables: “The cruelty of the factory farms—the cages are small, the slaughter is violent” (Foer 67). Spiritually, I cannot tolerate the brutal methods of animal treatment, which industrial ranchers and meat producers tend to follow in the 21st century. Therefore, it is important to follow an ethical version of the Standard American Diet, which provide the healthiest and most ethical production of food for human health. I believe that all living things should be treated with respect and reverence for what they provide, which sustains my own life through the sacrifice of their own. These are important aspects of the omnivore diet, which can be sustainable in the modern world. I follow a code of ethics in terms of how animals should be processed for consumption. The problem with eating meat is not necessarily eating the meat itself; it is respecting that another life form has given me life. This is why I support organically produced foods that will be processed through ethical farming methods within the general framework of the Standard American

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