Oedipus, the King and Allegory of the Cave - Comparative Analysis Essa

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In Sophocles' play, Oedipus, the King, there are various instances where Oedipus tries to escape his destiny—enlightenment—only to discover the truth that he cannot. Similarly, in Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" the prisoner travails to understand and adjust to his newly visited environment. In both works, the men first had to realize their ignorance before they could begin to acquire knowledge and true understanding of the complexities of the human condition. Specifically, in Oedipus, the King, it was Oedipus' illusion of himself as a man unequaled in leadership whereas in "Allegory of the Cave" it was the prisoner's initial refutations of enlightenment being shown him until he realizes its intellectual, spiritual, and social significance.
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<br>In both articles of literature, there are places where their ignorance and eventual achievement of enlightenment is highlighted. In Oedipus, the King it is when he is accusing Creon of conspiring against him, calling him a "murderer" and supposedly having exposed him as a "robber attempting to steal…[his] throne." Here, he does not yet realize that not only has not Creon attempted to overthrow him, but also that he is not the man who has already figured everything out about humanity as he thinks. He later does, fortunately, discover that he was not the true ill-fated man who never learned anything because he knew everything too soon. He discovers, after piercing out his eyes, that he has finally ar-rived at the truth of his life and that he now has a responsibility to share his story with his children, ex-tended family, and citizens so that they can live lives that are true—both to themselves and to the far greater universe; the best example of this is when he comments to the chorus "The evil is mine; no one but me can bear its weight." As for Plato's "Allegory of the Cave," the prisoner's difficulty discovering the truth lies in his unfortunate constricted life within the dark cave. Because of his imprisonment from

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