October Crisis

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OCTOBER CRISIS
Mairead Dunn
Mr. .Burke
November 23, 2012

SUMMARY OF MAIN POINTS
October Crisis:
-series of events triggered by two kidnappings of government officials by members of the Front de libération du Québec (FLQ) during October 1970 in Quebec, and mainly Montreal metropolitan area.
-culminated in the only peacetime use of the War Measures Act in Canada’s history
-was invoked by Governor General of Canada Roland Michener at the direction of the Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau,
-requested by the Premier of Quebec Robert Bourassa, and Mayor of Montreal, Jean Drapeau.
-took place the same time as the widespread deployment of Canadian Forces troops throughout Quebec and Ottawa under separate legislation, giving the appearance that martial law had been imposed, although the military remained in support role to the civil authorities of Quebec.
-from 1963-1970 the Quebec nationalist group (FLQ) had denoted over 95 bombs.
-this was during the 1960s; a national liberation movement sprang up in Quebec, calling for an independent province.
-means of action was terrorism
-In October 1970 a Quebec minister and a British diplomat were abducted
-Canada was plunged into its worst crisis since the Second World War when a radical Quebec group raised the stakes on separatism.
-4 men posing as deliverymen kidnapped the two people
-In October 1970, the Quebec government requested the assistance of the Canadian Armed Forces to help protect politicians and important buildings during the October Crisis. Pictured here, children watching soldiers (The Gazette and National Archives of Canada, PA-129833)
-n October 15 the Québec government requested the assistance of the Canadian Armed Forces to supplement the local police, and on October 16 the federal government proclaimed the existence of a state of "apprehended insurrection" under the WAR MEASURES ACT.
-Under the emergency regulations, the FLQ was banned, normal liberties were suspended, and arrests and

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