Obituary for Archie Roy

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Obituary for Professor Archie Roy

Professor Archie Roy of Edinburgh passed away at age 88 on March 21st, 2013. A member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh as well as a professor of Astronomy at Glasgow University, Archie Roy was the world authority on the mechanics of orbits, which he researched on long before computers and other machines were capable of doing the work. Throughout the 1960s and 70s he worked for Nasa as a consultant, helping them put the first man on the Moon. He also had an asteroid named after him, 5806 Archie-Roy. Despite all of his many accomplishments in the educational and research field, he became widely known by the public for his work in the spirit world. He began his journey into researching spirits after he lost his way in the Glasgow Old University library, only to find himself in the sections on spiritualism and physical research. His initial reaction was anything but excited, admitting he thought “What is this rubbish doing in a university library?”. Although curiosity got the best of him, and he began to open and flip through some of the books. “I was surprised to recognize some of the authors of this ‘rubbish’, such as Sir Oliver Lodge, Professor William James, Professor Sir William Crookes, and so on. My balloon of ignorance was punctured by the needle of my scientific curiosity, and I found myself called up to a new career.” he said. From that moment on Archie Roy investigated the paranormal activity being reported, alongside his work in astronomy. He often contributed to the BBC Scotland radio and television shows discussions on the topic. Being a member, and once the president, of the London-based Society for Physical Research, in 1987 he became the founder (and president) of the Scottish Society for Physical Research. He then started to give evening classes on the subject at Glasgow University’s School of Physics and Astronomy from the early 1980s, up until 2010. Roy was often called into homes of those who claimed

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