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Nypd Corruption

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Nypd Corruption
Corruption within law enforcements- NYPD

Police corruption is a problem that has and will continue to affect us all, whether we are civilian or law enforcement officers. An examination of any newspapers or police-related publications on any given day will have an article about an officer that got busted committing some kind of illegal act. Since its beginnings, many aspects of it have changed, however, a lot of it remains and it seems to just keep growing. Even though being a policeman is one of the most commendable and honorable professions in society, there have been certain instances that demonstrate misconduct and corruption in terms of unethical violence, illegal drug abuse, bribery and unjustified arrests.

The infamous beating of Rodney King in 1991 and the death of Sean Bell in 2006 are two most explicit examples of police officers stooping down to unethical violence and using excessive force as a means of enforcing the law. Police officers have been put on trial numerous times in history for using such excessive force or taking action without having enough supporting evidence. The 8th amendment of the Bill of Rights protects civilians from such cruel and unusual punishment. Officers are allowed to use force only if a suspect is refusing arrest. Police brutality results in the destruction of the communities trust. Police officers are the portrait of protectors and if they are displaying such violence themselves then who would the public trust? Who would they turn to when they need help?

In a TV interview with Eyewitness News, Officer Adil Polanco of the NYPD stated how officers are making arrests and stopping citizens just to maintain a quota to show that the police department has a tight grip on the crime rate. Officer Polanco also told eyewitness news that the monthly quota for NYPD was 20 summonses and 1 arrest. The petrol supervisor of precinct 41 stated in a recording, “Next week you could be 25 and 1, you could be 35 and 1, and

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