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Nursing Role In Patient Advocacy

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Nursing Role In Patient Advocacy
Nursing advocacy
Introduction
Nurses are bound to experience issues on a day-to-day basis where it becomes their ethical and moral obligation to provide advocacy for patients and their family. The concerns can be attributed to the unprecedented changes in the healthcare systems. The uncertainty results in new regulations being implemented, financial burdens on the patient and the trend of population rise. These challenges present an opportunity for the nurses to adopt a more responsible role of patient advocacy (Benner et al., 2010 & Institute of Medicine, 2011). Nurses and managers should be able to advocate for patients through the use of technology and distribution of resources (Marquis and Huston, 2012).
Nursing advocacy Role
American
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As patient’s advocates, nurses need to provide care that is qualitative, safe and at the same time beneficial to the patients. My patient was a cancer patient that was going through much pain and at the same time, the doctors were worried about the adverse effect of too much pain medication being administered to this patient which is liver damage and dependency on narcotics. On the other hand, the patient’s cancer has advanced to stage II and her chances of survival were very minimal. In this case, palliative care would have been better for the patient but the patient and her family members were still in denial of the outcome of the patient’s condition and refused to accept hospice care. If I did not act the way I did, the hospital would have been reported to the ombudsman and would have been under …show more content…
Advocacy is one of the vital leadership roles of a nurse which we must apply to our day-to-day care of patients (Marquis and Huston, 2012). There are standing orders that nurses should abide by when taking care of patients. Nurses should be able to decipher when to advocate for better care options for patients. Communication, therefore, plays an important role in patient advocacy. The nurse has to keep in mind that communicating issues in a professional way to family members and colleagues as well is very important. Another important aspect of the process is for the nurse to be able to influence the people involved in the decision making.

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