Preview

Nursing Knowledge Analysis

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
992 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Nursing Knowledge Analysis
Knowledge development in nursing has been somewhat of a hot topic in the more scholastic endeavors of the profession for quite some time. As the profession grew from a focus centered on treating physical symptoms and conditions to a more well-rounded approach that considered psychological, social, and spiritual needs in addition to physical illness, the need to break down the process of knowledge development arose. By utilizing nursing theories, which support the use of evidenced based practice in most cases, it seems as though the profession of nursing gained more credibility in the scientific community as far as the value of the knowledge produced; I feel that utilizing processes akin to those already accepted as prudent by more ‘established’ …show more content…
She admits that nursing has situations in which our therapeutic actions can be supported by one theory and conflicted by another. What it seemed to re-enforce was how our drive to answer the philosophical questions created by the issues we wish to address can use various forms to achieve that common goal, however, those that are centered around the evaluation of how our therapeutic actions actually pan out versus how we think they pan out will help us gain the most useful knowledge as long as we are able to recognize the need for, and benefit of, changes that help our patients out the most. We wouldn’t be able to gain the ‘knowledge’ that specific actions and changes are therapeutically beneficial without understanding why we wanted to make changes in the first place, and generating multiple attempts at making those changes to see which ones actually accomplished the goal would seemingly allow us to have the best chance at achieving what we set out …show more content…
Abbott (1988) pointed out that although nursing is capable of evaluating our interventions in practice, we do not tend to emphasize the importance of breaking down specific practical interventions in an abstract way that allows for our ability to link the interventions we utilize to the thought processes behind it while we are out practicing our craft. This I can personally relate to, when considering how the first couple years of my personal practice was spent learning how to simply accomplish the tasks I was presented with in the time frame I was to accomplish them in (assessment, documenting, intervening, documenting, evaluating, intervening, documenting, documenting, documenting…ugh). I knew that there was good reason behind the things I was doing; however, I was not keenly aware of the concepts and philosophies that comprised that reasoning, I was simply focused on completing my tasks in a timely, safe

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    In this chapter (Carper, 2006) looks at the patterns of knowing. What does it really mean to know? The author looks at what kinds of knowledge is valued, and who values that knowledge.There are four fundamental components; (1) the empirics of nursing, looks at providing explanation for a phenomena and systematically giving relevance to those phenomena. (2) Esthetics of nursing refers to the art of nursing. There seems to be much discord with the descriptor in terms of “the art” of nursing. It is viewed by Weitz, as complicated and too open for one definition of esthetic theory to exist. Esthetic knowing is expressive in nature. It refers to the creativity and openness of discovery within the development of new knowledge. Weidenbach referred to the action taken for the patient that would change behavior is the visible component that validates the action taken by the nurse. Empathy is a central component in the esthetic process. Orem looks at the art of nursing as the ability of the individual nurse to utilize creative and expressive actions that provide satisfying and effective patient outcomes. (3) Personal knowledge has been identified as the most challenging and often problematic to overcome. It is difficult to teach because it involves the relationship and interactions the nurse develops with patient. It is impacted by the view of an individual self. It is believed the experienced nurse has a heightened awareness of subjective views that will allow for empathetic understanding in the lives of others. Personal knowledge gives rise to subjective, and concrete knowledge brought to the relationship it requires acceptance of others and their personal freedoms.…

    • 483 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Empirical knowing or knowledge is simply the science of nursing (Hunter, 2008). Empirical knowledge in nursing literature had a late start having only been around since the 1950’s. Since then, there has been an increasing importance placed on the development of a body of empirical knowledge on nursing. With empirical knowing, science of nursing can be categorized into general law and theories (Carper, 1978). The pattern on knowing labeled as “nursing science” does not reflect the same characteristics as the more advanced sciences. Nursing attempts to assess knowledge, question its validity and take the information and incorporate it into specific situations. This can be expressed in facts, specific concept or theory which can be used to predict specific outcomes. Currently, in the development of nursing science, new concepts and experiences continue to occur in health and illness with regards to human life. These new concepts and experiences in the nursing sciences should be seen as breakthroughs in nursing. Carper expresses the need for nursing to expand empirical…

    • 1599 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    All nursing theory should lead to enhance nursing practice. Through theory, knowledge is gained and enhances the empowering of nurses; it aids in deliberate action and provides rationale when challenged, and provides professional autonomy by…

    • 1683 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Have you questioned the relevance of taking a theory course in your graduate nursing program, or the usefulness of theory in nursing practice? In the case study provided, Julia Costales was skeptical about theory in nursing practice, and on a day at the veterans’ administration (VA) inpatient medical unit, she was caring for a complex patient. The medical unit’s acute care nurse practitioner challenged her to identify theories that would help guide care for her patient. McEwen (2014a) explains that, “Use of theory also promotes rational and systematic practice by challenging and validating intuition. Theories make nursing practice more overtly purposeful by stating not only the focus of practice but also specific goals and outcomes” (p. 25).…

    • 482 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    “Concept clarification is an important step in developing useful and useable knowledge in nursing science.” (Tofthagen, 2010). Within the home health field of nursing, one of the major and most significant concepts is “team” work. “Simply stated, concept analysis incorporates a method or approach by which concepts that are of interest to a discipline are examined in order to clarify their characteristics or attributes” (Cronin, 2010). Within a home health care team there are; Registered Nurses, Physical Therapists, Home Health Aides, Medical Social Workers, Managed Care Coordinators, and Clinical Managers. Teams develop specific goals and a plan of care is designed and established. “In 2003, the Institute of Medicine identified care coordination as a priority to improve the health care system” (American Nurses Association, 2012) Changes in vital signs or signs and symptoms of infections that are not communicated between the…

    • 497 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    USA Nursing Knowledge Consensus Conference, 1998, Consensus Statement on Emerging Nursing Knowledge, A value-Based Position Paper Linking Nursing knowledge and Practice Outcomes, Boston, Massachusetts…

    • 1937 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    There is no definition of the term "role stress" in the dictionary, so first the article examines the concept of stress alone. Although it is a common term in modern-day vocabulary, its meaning is vague. In the 1930 's Hans Seyle, an endocrinologist who was the first to demonstrate the existence of biological stress, describes stress as the phenomenon of any living organisms experiencing any form of strain (The Canadian Medical Hall of Fame, 2014). In 1966, another definition proposed the inclusion of stress ' result on behavior. "Stress, as a universal human and animal phenomenon, results in an intense distressing experience and appears to be of tremendous influence in behavior" (Riahi, 2011, p. 722). Later in 2003, a definition more focused within the nursing profession transpired. The author of the description said that stress occurred when demands placed upon a person exceed the available resources the individual possesses in order to manage (Riahi, 2011). Still without a definition for role stress, a description for occupational stress was introduced. It stated," any force that pushes a psychological or physical factor beyond its range of ability, producing strain within an individual" (Riahi, 2011, p. 723) is considered occupational stress. Eventually, the concept of role stress acquired a…

    • 2103 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Best Essays

    McCurry, M.K., Revell, S.M.H., & Roy, C. (2009). Knowledge for the good of the individual…

    • 680 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Best Essays

    Importance of Theory

    • 1807 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The primary purpose of studying nursing theories is to study and test propositions and hypothesis in research to develop scientific knowledge in the field of nursing (Sieloff & Frey, 2007). It is important to understand how nursing knowledge and patient care is affected by the nursing theory that we choose to practice under. In the 2008 Willis et.al. Study and dialog on nursing basis argued that, nursing’s survival as a healing practice may depend on all nursing being able to clearly articulate a central unifying focus. Despite the nursing theory that one might choose to practice under, the unspoken law of do no harm and focus on caring for the patient as a whole continues to be the main focus of all nursing theories. Nursing theories help to guide…

    • 1807 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    application of theory

    • 2236 Words
    • 12 Pages

    1. Introduction to the paper includes a few general statements on the idea of nursing theory being applied to solve problems/issues in nursing practice, regardless of the specialty area of practice. For example, why would one pick a nursing theory to solve a practice problem? Would a grand, middle-range, or practice theory be best? Does the writer have any experience in using nursing theory this way? In addition, a brief one-paragraph summary of a specific nursing theory and information on the sections of the paper are provided. The selected nursing theory can be a grand theory, a middle-range theory, or a practice theory.…

    • 2236 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    From the initial days of Florence Nightingale to today’s integrated era, nursing theory has set the pace as nursing practice has developed into a recognized scientific discipline. In order for a profession or discipline to transform from a vocation there is a need for the discipline to establish and to validate itself (Bond, 2011). Nursing has utilized nursing theory, research and practice to do this. Nursing theory is part of the three-prong effort to develop the body of knowledge that is nursing. Nursing theory drives research in that it helps to focus research on concepts that are significant to the delivery of nursing care. Without nursing theory, research efforts are squandered, as there is no structure to apply the learned knowledge to. The use of nursing theory as a framework or a blueprint helps to identify the need for research and guide the process to validate or reject the anticipated outcomes proposed by…

    • 1903 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Nursing Theory

    • 799 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Theory development surfaced in nursing because of its leader’s desire for nursing to be considered a profession, and then to help nurses increase their knowledge of practice, what it is and what it can be. Theories can help to identify a clearer picture of practice than using facts alone (Walker & Avant, 2005). The following paper will discuss three of these theories and their authors as they relate to currency and ability of use in practice settings.…

    • 799 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Patterns of Knowing

    • 359 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The fundamental reason for developing knowledge in nursing is for the purpose of creating expert and effective nursing practice. It is through inquiry processes for each pattern that knowledge is formulated for the discipline. The main concept of knowledge is that all patterns of knowing form an integrated whole, and the whole of knowing is essential as a basis for best practices in nursing. Chinn & Kramer(2008) states failure to develop knowledge integrated within all of the patterns of knowing leads to uncritical acceptance, narrow interpretation, and partial utilization of knowledge which is called “the patterns gone wild”(p. 20).…

    • 359 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Nursing Knowledge Through the Nursing Process Team C Holly Briner Lee Castro Stephanie Collins Brandon Hazlett Tammy Moore Jennifer Smith Assessment Nur/403 Ms. Van Baren 07/14/2014 Diagnosis Plan Implementati on Evaluation Nursing Process…

    • 1155 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Hope is a powerful thing; it can be the only thing some people hold on to when everything else has failed them. It can also provide patients with something to focus on when experiencing times of trouble or hardship. It is also an abstract concept that can have many meanings and can be interpreted many different ways. Nweze, Agom, Agom, and Nwankwo (2015), focused on the concept analysis of hope from the perspective of the nursing discipline so nurses can have a further understand of how to apply this concept to patient care (Nweze, et al, 2015, p.1027). Analysis of this concept was completed as per Walker and Avant method of concept analysis. Understanding hope and its effects…

    • 991 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays