Nursing and Psychiatric/mental Health

Topics: Nursing, Psychiatry, Psychiatric and mental health nursing Pages: 18 (6422 words) Published: September 13, 2010
| Home | Editors | Current Issue | Archives | Instructions for Authors | Disclaimer | Share with others |   What Makes a Quality Therapeutic Relationship in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing: A Review of the Research Literature Read printer friendly  Subscribe in a reader Share with others Related Articles * A Phenomenographic Approach To Examine The Different Ways HIV Patients Understand The Experience Of Counselling * A Brief Report on the Characteristics of Young Male Adults Experiencing their First Episodes of Psychosis: Implications for Developing Specialized First Episode Programs * The Prevalence of Depression, Anxiety and Stress in Brunei Preservice Student Teachers * How Can I Help? Responding Effectively To The Mental Health Care Needs Of Individuals With Intellectual Disability * Giant Gastric Trichobezoar In A Female TeenagerFiona Dziopa BPsyc, BN (Hons), RN School of Nursing & Midwifery

The University of Queensland

Address:
Australia
Kathy Ahern Ph.D., RN
School of Nursing & Midwifery
The University of Queensland

Address:
Australia
Citation: F. Dziopa & K. Ahern : What Makes a Quality Therapeutic Relationship in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing: A Review of the Research Literature . The Internet Journal of Advanced Nursing Practice. 2009 Volume 10 Number 1Keywords: Nurse-Patient Relationship | Psychiatric Nursing | Mental Health | Review Literature Table of Contents * Introduction/ Background * Literature Review * Understanding and Empathy * Individuality * Providing Support * Being There/ Being Available * Being ‘Genuine’ * Promoting Equality * Demonstrating Respect * Demonstrating clear boundaries * Demonstrating Self Awareness * Conclusion And Recommendations * Corresponding author AbstractAlthough a therapeutic relationship is essential to psychiatric/mental health nursing practice, its use is problematic because the nursing attributes contributing to a therapeutic relationship are elusive. A review of the literature in the field of psychiatric/mental health nursing was conducted to conceptualize constructs contributing to the development of a therapeutic relationship in advanced practice psychiatric/mental health nursing. A typology of nine general attributes were identified which have practical implications for psychiatric/mental health nursing education and practice. Recommendations include the application of a typology of constructs upon which psychiatric/mental health nurse curricula, in-service education, and reflective practice can be based. Introduction/ BackgroundThe establishment of a quality nurse-patient relationship is considered important in most nursing situations (1). However, in psychiatric/mental health nursing, the interpersonal interaction is the core of practice (2,3) making the therapeutic relationship a fundamental element of mental health care (4). Indeed, the therapeutic relationship employed in mental health care has been associated with therapeutic outcomes across a range of clinical settings and patient populations (5).Ironically, despite the therapeutic relationship being vital to treatment outcomes, the formation of a quality therapeutic relationship between the psychiatric/mental health nurse and patient is not an instinctive occurrence and requires great skill to be established (6). Berg and Hallberg (7) found that caring for people with mental illness ‘demands an intensified presence, not allowing one to glide away, close the door or just disappear’ (p. 329). The daily work demand requires psychiatric/mental health nurses have the capacity to handle continually new and unpredictable experiences (7). This endeavour is made more difficult because in some situations psychiatric/mental health nurses are faced with the paradox of providing therapeutic care in conjunction with involuntary treatment (8) and detainment (9). In short, psychiatric/mental health nurses require specialized skills in order to develop and maintain...

References: . Forchuk C, Reynolds W. Clients ' reflections on relationships with nurses: comparison form Canadian and Scotland. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 2001;8:45-51. (s)2. Cleary M, Edwards C. 'Something always comes up ': nurse-patient interaction in an acute psychiatric setting. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 1999;6:469-477. (s)3. Cleary M, Edwards C, Meehan T. Factors influencing nurse patient interaction in the acute psychiatric setting: an exploratory investigation. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 1999;8:109-116. (s)4. McGuire R, McCabe R, Priebe S. Theoretical frameworks for understanding and investigating the therapeutic relationship in psychiatry. Social Psychiatry Psychiatric Epidemiology. 2001;36:557-564. (s)5. McCabe R, Priebe S. The therapeutic relationship in the treatment of severe mental illness. A review of methods and findings International Journal of Social Psychiatry. 2004;50(2):115-128. (s)6. Moyle W. Nurse-patient relationship: a dichotomy of expectations. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 2003;12:103-109. (s)7. Berg A, Hallberg IR. Psychiatric nurses ' lived experiences of working with inpatient care on a general team psychiatric ward. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 2000;7:323-333. (s)8. Scanlon A. Psychiatric nurses perceptions of the constituents of the therapeutic relationship: a grounded theory study. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 2006;13:319-329. (s)9. Rask M, Brunt D. Verbal and social interactions in Swedish forensic psychiatric nursing care as perceived by the patient and nurses International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 2006;15(2):100-110. (s)10. Welch M. Pivotal moments in the therapeutic relationship. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 2005;14:161-165. (s)11. Weissmark MS, Giacomo DA. Measuring therapeutic interaction: Research and clinical applications. Psychiatry. 1995;58(2):173. (s)12. French P. What is the evidence on evidence-based nursing? An epistemological concern. . Journal of Advanced Nursing. (2002);37(3):250-257. (s)13. Johansson H, Eklund M. Patients ' opinion on what constitutes good psychiatric care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences. 2003;17:339-346. (s)14. Shattell M, McAllister S, Hogan B, Thomas SP. "She took the time to make sure she understood: Mental health patients ' experience of being understood. Archives of Psychiatric Nursing. 2006;20(5):234-241. (s)15. Shattell M, Starr SS, Thomas SP. 'Take my hand, help me out ': Mental health service recipients ' experience of the therapeutic relationship. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 2007;16:274-284. (s)16. O 'Brien L. Nurse client relationships: the experience of community psychiatric nurses. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 2000;9:184-194. (s)17. Walsh K. Shared humanity and the psychiatric nurse-patient encounter. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 1999;8:2-8. (s)18. Geanellos R. Transformative change of self: The unique focus of (adolescent) mental health nursing. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 2002;11:174-185. (s)19. Hem MH, Heggen K. Being professional and being human: one nurse 's relationship with a psychiatric patient. Journal of Advanced Nursing. 2003;43(1):101-108. (s)20. Jackson S, Stevenson C. What do people need psychiatric and mental health nurses for? Journal of Advanced Nursing. 2000;31(2):378-388. (s)21. Schafer P, Peternelj-Taylor C. Therapeutic relationships and boundary maintenance: the perspective of forensic patients enrolled in a treatment program for violent offenders. Issues in mental health nursing. 2003;24(605-625). (s)22. Rydon SE. The attitudes, knowledge and skills needed in mental health nurses: The perspectives of users of mental health services. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 2005;14:78-87. (s)23. Muller A, Poggenpoel M. Patients ' internal world experiences of interacting with psychiatric nurses. Archives of Psychiatric Nursing. 1996;10(3):143-150. (s)24. O 'Brien AJ. Negotiating the relationship: Mental health nurses ' perceptions of their practice. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 1999:153-161. (s)25. Thomas SP, Shattell M, Martin T. What 's therapeutic about the therapeutic milieu? Archives of Psychiatric Nursing. 2002;14:99-107. (s)26. Coastworth-Puspoky R, Forchuk C, Ward-Griffin C. Nurse-patient process in mental health: recipients ' perspectives. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing 2006;13:347-355. (s)27. Yamishita M, Forchuk C, Mound B. Nurse case management: negotiating care together within a developing relationship. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care. 2005;41(2):62-70. (s)28. Langley GC, Klooper H. Trust as a foundation for the therapeutic intervention for patients with borderline personality disorders. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 2005;12:23-32. (s)29. McAllister S, Matarasso B, Dixon B, Shepperd C. Conversation starters: re-examining and reconstructing first encounters within the therapeutic relationship Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 2004;11(575-582). (s)30. Martin T, Street AF. Exploring evidence of the therapeutic relationship in forensic nursing Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 2003;10:531-551. (s)31. Forchuk C, Westwell J, Martin M, Azzapardi WB, Kosterewa-Tolman D, Hux M. Factors influencing movement of chronic psychiatric patients from the orientation to the working phase of the nurse-client relationship on an inpatient unit. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care. 1998;34(1):36-44. (s)32. Adams R, Tilley S, Pollock L. Person first: what people with enduring mental disorders value about community psychiatric nurses and CPN services. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 2003;10:203-212. (s)33. Horberg U, Brunt D, Axelsson A. Patient 's perceptions of patient-nurse relationships in local authority psychiatric services: A qualitative study. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 2004;13:9-17. (s)34. Peternelj-Taylor CA, Younge O. Exploring boundaries in the Nurse-Client relationship: Professional roles and responsibilities. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care. 2003;39(2):55-66. (s)35. Hostick T, McClelland F. 'Partnership ': a co-operative inquiry between community mental health nurses and their patients. 2. The nurse-client relationship. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 2002;9(111-117). (s)36. Rask M, Aberg J. Swedish forensic nursing care: nurses ' professional contributions and educational needs. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 2002;9:531-539. (s)This article was last modified on Thu, 12 Mar 09 18:58:52 -0500This page was generated on Mon, 13 Sep 10 05:00:14 -0500, and may be cached. |
Home | Journals | Sponsors | Books | PubMed | Editorial Help | Privacy Policy | Disclaimer | Job Opportunities | Contact Copyright Internet Scientific Publications, LLC., 1996 to 2010. |
-------------------------------------------------
Top of Form
Bottom of Form
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Psychiatric Nursing Essay
  • Personal Philosophy of Mental Health Nursing Essay
  • Mental Health Study Guide 1 Essay
  • Reflection on mental health nursing placement using Gibbs (1988) model of reflection Essay
  • Mental Health: Peplau Essay
  • Mental Health Self Reflection Assignment 1 Essay
  • Discuss Five Clinical Inteventions from Mental Health Practise Essay
  • stress and psychiatric nursing performance Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free