Notes on Modernism

Topics: Modernism, Ezra Pound, World War I Pages: 8 (1549 words) Published: December 31, 2013
Other nodernism terms
Expressionism
Presented a wildly distorted and symbolic world to reflect the feelings and emotions of the character or author 
Expressionism
Authors include Kafka, T.S. Eliot, Joyce, Ralph Ellison

Imagism
Rejected sentimentality and cloudy verbiage and aimed for new clarity in short lyrical poems. They believed images carry the poem. Meaning happens in the air. 
Imagism
There were four basic rules of the movement: 1. use the common language of speech 2. use the exact word 3. images in poetry should be "hard and clear" 4. Write in free verse. 
Imagism
Authors include Ezra Pound, Amy Lowell, William Carlos Williams, Hilda Doolittle 
Imagism
Ran from about 1912-1917

Imagism
They were influenced by Japanese haiku, a form of short lyric verse that arose in the 16th century. The goal of a haiku was to capture a single impression of a natural object or scene within a particular season in 17 syllables in three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables. 

Imagism
Poems include "A Lover" (1917), "Autumn" (1919), and "Opal" (1919), all by Amy Lowell 
Magic Realism
Fabulous and fantastical events are included in a narrative that otherwise maintains objective realism 
Magic Realism
Authors include Jorge Luis Borges Borges and Zora Neale Hurston (More specifically the scene with talking vultures in "Their Eyes were Watching God) 
Minimalism
Extreme restriction of a work's contents to a bare minimum of necessary elements 
Minimalism
Authors include Samuel Beckett, Ernest Hemingway, and the imagists 
Modernism
A general term applied retrospectively to the wide range of experimental and avant-garde trends in the literature and other arts of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, mainly in Europe and North America. The movement's literature is characterized chiefly by a rejection of 19th-century traditions and of their consensus between author and reader: conventions of realism or traditional meter. 

Modernism
ran from around 1890 to 1950

Modernism
influences include Walt Whitman, Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, Charles Darwin, Friedrich Nietzsche, Albert Einstein 
Modernism
Themes include:
• Anti-romantic
• Moral relativism
• Reject past traditions and turn away from religion, traditions (marriage) and other societal values or traditions • Reject past literary traditions (form, structure, theme, narration, etc.) 

Modernism
• Agonized recollection of the past
• World is fragmented, broken
• Atheism—poet/author/work responsible for transcendence/spiritual (not God or church) • The work of literature is the only place where order and meaning can be found 
Modernism
• Alienation and loneliness
• Individualism
• Loss/despair/hopelessness/apathy
• Disillusionment
• Paralysis—an inability to act

Modernism
• Heavy use of allusions (to other works of literature, Greek myth, the Bible) • Detached, ironic narrator or speaker
• Irony and satire
• Impressionism—when an author provides a subjective impression of a scene rather than a detailed, objective description (Conrad, Woolf) • Rejection of realism

Modernism
• Nonlinear structure
• Free verse (no set rhyme or meter—Whitman)
• Stream of consciousness—a continuous, rapid flow of sense-perceptions, thoughts, feelings, and memories usually in unpunctuated paragraphs. (Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner) • Frustration of common expectations of coherence


Modernism
• Purposeful obfuscation
• Ironic and ambiguous juxtapositions
• Multiple points of view and/or narrators
• Synaesthesia—blending or confusion of different kinds of sense impressions, in which one type of sensation is referred to in terms more appropriate to another. Ex: A loud shade of red, a smooth whisper, a sweet touch, etc. (Symbolists, Imagists) 

Modernism
Audience was mostly elite, not a general audience (especially Pound and Eliot)—as opposed to most romantics 
Surrealism
An...
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