NOTE ON BLAKE

Topics: Poetry by William Blake, The Lamb, The Tyger Pages: 2 (624 words) Published: April 18, 2014
Introduction-
‘The Tyger’ and ‘The lamb’ belong to Blake’s celebrated volumes of poetry- Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience respectively. The child’s simplicity and the adult’s sagacity are remarkably balanced and harmonized in them. Comparative view of both songs-

‘The Lamb’ has belongs to Songs of Innocence, as the Songs in volume are intended for the expression of the spontaneity of joy and freedom, simplicity and purity, in childhood. Blake here appears to be a pioneer in literature for children. “The Tyger” has belongs to Songs of Experience are poles asunder from the songs of innocence. The speakers in the two poems have different notions of the Deity and the divine nature. The speaker in The Tyger conceives of the creator dimly inhuman terms. The creator of the tiger appears to him an artisan of wonderful skill and strength. The maker might be a subordinate belief who collects materials from remote and dangerous parts of the universe with a great daring. The speaker says- “In what distant deeps or skies

Burnt the fire of thine eyes?”
Spirituality-
The romantic mystic in Blake is a spiritualist. The theme of the poem The Tyger has a spiritual undercurrent which flows underneath the vigorous animal images. The poem records a child’s vision of God’s creative art, a part of which is the tyger, with its fearful and fierce appearance, just as the Lamb is with its innocent and mild look. The whole poem bears out Blake’s visionary glimplses and mystical notes. It is really a piece of wonderful imagination to conceive the tiger as the entire subject matter of a poem. In view of speaker’s childless & the speaker in view if ‘The Tyger’- In ‘The Tyger’ the speaker has constant answer as the beast takes shape, the tension becomes greater, the questions break off in mid-sentences and the questioner speaks in breathless grasp of wonder until the process is complete at the end of the stanza IV. On the contrary, the child asks the question of the lamb and...
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