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No Exit

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Jean-Paul Sartre's thought of existentialism is that everyone is completely free to make there own decisions and completely responsibilities for the actions that come from those free choices. In his play No Exit the character Garcin is in “bad faith” according to Sartre for three things he does.
Garcin's first example of displaying bad faith comes with what he does to his wife. He's not condemned for treating her badly or being and adulterer, but instead his bad faith comes not from his actions against his wife, but for his reasons for doing them. He defines his wife in a specific role – a victim – and refuses to see her as anything else. By self-deception he has tricked himself into believing his wife is an object and not a person. Sartre said “the self is something that can never be defined categorically; it exists outside of and beyond any description of it.” He identifies three different categories of "being." The first is called "being-in-itself," and this is the being we apply to objects, like a car. People, on the other hand are living creatures, so they're described as "being-for-itself." Humans will always be “being-for-itself” and never “being-in-itself” and that's the problem with giving some one a role such as Garcin gave to his wife as a victim, it's an attempt to exist in being-in-itself. With his self-deception of his wife being an object he is in bad faith.
Next Garcin tries to define his self as courageous, but according to Sartre to have the value of courage to be describing him, he must have been brave his whole life, even up to his death. He convinced himself into believing he was courageous, when in fact he really was a coward. In doing so he deceived himself into believing something that wasn't true about his own character traits, and made him in bad faith.
Sartre's last definition of “being” is “being-for others,” which is when you are turned into an object under the gaze of another person. Garcin being in the room with others, competitive subjectivity occurs, where people fight over who is going to be the subject and who's the object. This is why hell is other people because under someone else's gaze your under judgment of them and if you care what other people say then your under eternal judgment. This being-for-others is an escape for people in anguish of being so radically free according to Sartre's view of existentialism. Garcin chooses to flee; from his freedom and be defined not by his own actions or choices, but by the look and judgment of other people. His devotion to convince Estelle and Inez he is courageous, or his obsession with Gomez and his reputation on earth show he lives through being-for-others to feel good about himself by what other people think of him. Ultimately, this being-for-others bad faith is what dominates Garcin, and keeps him in hell.

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