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New World Order in Conspiracy Theory

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New World Order in Conspiracy Theory
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New World Order (conspiracy theory)
This article is about the use of the term New World Order in conspiracy theory. For other uses, see New World Order (disambiguation).
The reverse side of the Great Seal of the United States (1776). The Latin phrase "novus ordo seclorum", appearing on the reverse side of the Great Seal since 1782 and on the back of the U.S one-dollar bill since 1935, means "New Order of the Ages" and only alludes to the beginning of an era where the United States of America is an independent nation-state, but is often improperly translated by conspiracy theorists as "New World Order".[1]
In conspiracy theory, the term New World Order or NWO refers to the emergence of a bureaucratic collectivist one-world government.[2][3][4][5][6]
The common theme in conspiracy theories about a New World Order is that a secretive power elite with a globalist agenda is conspiring to eventually rule the world through an authoritarian world government, which replaces sovereign nation-states, and an all-embracing ideology, which indoctrinates cosmopolitanism. Significant occurrences in politics and finance are speculated to be orchestrated by an extremely influential cabaloperating through many front organizations. Numerous historical and current events are seen as steps in an on-going plot to achieve world domination through secret political gatherings and decision-making processes.[2][3][4][5][6]
Prior to the early 1990s, New World Order conspiracism was limited to two American countercultures, primarily the militantly anti-government right, and secondarily fundamentalist Christians concerned with end-time emergence of the Antichrist.[7] Skeptics, such as Michael Barkun andChip Berlet, have expressed concern that right-wing conspiracy theories about a New World Order have now not only been embraced by many left-wing conspiracy theorists but have seeped into popular culture, thereby inaugurating an unrivaled period of



References: 1. ^ a b Lewis and Short, A Latin Dictionary: Founded on Andrews ' Edition of Freund 's Latin Dictionary: Revised, Enlarged, and in Great Part Rewritten by Charlton T. Lewis, Ph.D. and Charles Short, LL.D. The Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1879, s. vv. 2. ^ a b c d Camp, Gregory S. (1997). Selling Fear: Conspiracy Theories and End-Times Paranoia. Commish Walsh. 3. ^ a b c Berlet Chip; Lyons, Matthew N. (2000). Right-Wing Populism in America: Too Close for Comfort. Guilford Press. ISBN 1572305622. 4. ^ a b Goldberg, Robert Alan (2001). Enemies Within: The Culture of Conspiracy in Modern America. Yale University Press. ISBN 0300090005. 5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Barkun, Michael (2003). A Culture of Conspiracy: Apocalyptic Visions in Contemporary America. University of California Press; 1 edition.ISBN 0520238052. 6. ^ a b Fenster, Mark (2008). Conspiracy Theories: Secrecy and Power in American Culture. 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(September 2005). "Co-opting the counter culture: Troy Southgate and the National Revolutionary Faction". Patterns of Prejudice 39 (3): 301–326.doi:10.1080/00313220500198292. ISSN 0031-322X. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 18. ^ Grice, Andrew (12 January 2009). This was the Bretton Woods of our times. Retrieved 2009-07-23. 19. ^ Kissinger, Henry A. (Monday, January 12, 2009). The chance for a new world order. Retrieved 2009-07-23. 20. ^ Nimmo, Kurt (March 31, 2009). Hannity, Morris Agree with "Conspiracy People" About New World Order. Retrieved 2009-07-23. 21. ^ Media Matters for America (10 April 2009). Black helicopter alert! Conservative media suggest Obama supporting one-world government. Retrieved 2010-04-09. 22. ^ a b Holland, Joshua (12 June 2009). The Terrorist Threat: Right-Wing Radicals and the Eliminationist Mindset. Retrieved 2009-07-23. 23. ^ Krugman, Paul (11 June 2009). The Big Hate. 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