New Negro Movement

Good Essays
It was a cultural movement that extend over the 1920’s and defined African American literature. It caused an outburst of creativity in black artist and writers. It was influenced by African Americans migrating from the south seeking better opportunities. This movement was created to give blacks a voice and a place in society. This movement started a revolution one which change the discourse of blacks and helped reshape their culture. This movement was known as the New Negro Movement. Before the new negro movement World War I, made blacks think about the nature of their citizenship. Although the war didn’t change how blacks were treated it did change the way many of them thought about their conditions, their duties and privileges of citizenship. Whites separated themselves from blacks because they thought they were better. This caused blacks to lose trust in whites and be disloyal, but they couldn’t. African American’s during this time didn’t have a choice because they felt like they had no voice or place in society based upon how they were being treated. Black people during this time wanted to be accepted by whites …show more content…
this movement allowed blacks to express themselves in ways that they didn’t think they could. It created a new culture and spiritual movement all which was vital for creating a society that was equal for African American’s. According to Alain Locke book Enter the New Negro, he was suggesting that blacks had talents that could be used. However, they needed to find a way that they wouldn’t be exploited (). He wanted blacks to be on the same playing field of democracy. Meanwhile, this democracy wouldn’t be about capitalism but about making music, art, culture, and self-expression. This movement need to happen to reconstruct blackness. Basically, change the mindset of blacks and the way they view themselves. The new negro movement was an era that not only allowed them to express themselves but love their

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    The Negro Movement

    • 1348 Words
    • 6 Pages

    just how far the African American culture has come. The progression of the African American culture is indeed one to be proud of. From cotton fields to Harlem, “The New Negro Movement”, sparked a sense of cultural self-determination, with a yearning to strive for economic, political equality, and civic participation. This was a movement that sparked a wide range of advancements in the African American culture. Leaving footprints of great individuals as well as set a path way for future generations…

    • 1348 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    wanted to find a new value of their skin color in order to brake with old stereotypes. As E. Patrick Johnson states, during the time of Harlem Renaissance, blackness was perceived as a sort of a weapon to fight with the white dominance. During the time of slavery, African Americans were excluded from political and cultural life and, that is why, they decided to actively stand up against this subordination and exclusion (Johnson, 2003). 1.8. New Negro Movement New Negro Movement is a term coined…

    • 297 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In the early 1920's, African Americans were a great part of a cultural movement known as the Harlem Renaissance. "The New Negro Movement", later known as "The Harlem Renaissance" was an unexpected outburst of creative activity among African-Americans occurred in all fields of art… it caught the country by surprise. The migration of African Americans from the South brought them to Harlem, a New York area. The Harlem Renaissance brought out a lot of musical talent. Singers, musicians, writers, shopkeepers…

    • 326 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    the new negro

    • 3921 Words
    • 16 Pages

    The New Negro In the last decade something beyond the watch and guard of statistics has happened in the life of the American Negro and the three norms who have traditionally presided over the Negro problem have a changeling in their laps. The Sociologist, The Philanthropist, the Race-leader are not unaware of the New Negro, but they are at a loss to account for him. He simply cannot be swathed in their formulae. For the younger generation is vibrant with a new psychology; the new spirit is awake…

    • 3921 Words
    • 16 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    The New Negro Summary

    • 1408 Words
    • 6 Pages

    of Negro migration”. During this time in a movement known as the Great Migration, thousand of African Americans also known as Negros left their homes in the South and moved North toward the beach line of big cities in search of employment and a new beginning. They left the South because of racial violence such as the Ku Klux Klan and economic discrimination not able to obtain work. Their migration was an expression of their changing attitudes toward themselves as Locke said best From The New Negro…

    • 1408 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The essay The New Negro by Alain Locke’s defines what Locke believes to be the “Old Negro and the “New Negro. This paper will compare and contrasts Marcus Garvey The Future as I See it and Langston Hughes various poems on why Locke would have characterized them as either Old Negroes, New Negroes, or both. I believe Locke, Garvey , Hughes were determined to see Blacks succeed. Each writer expresses their idea in their own unique way, but they all wanted freedom, equality, and respect. For example…

    • 923 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    with the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, which is an African-American civil rights organization started by Ida B. Wells, W.E.B Du Bois, and many others to end the civil rights struggle. However, according “The Negro Movement”, some African-American critics began to challenge NAACP’s approach to the civil rights struggle, which is portrayed on the poem “If We Must Die”. From the excerpt “Black Conflict Over World War I” till “James Holden Johnson and Harlem in the…

    • 510 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Alain Locke, in "The New Negro," suggests that the "old Negro" is really nothing more than a myth or an ideal. He talks about the fact that there are aspects of Negro culture - such as the spiritual - that were beaten down but were accepted when finally allowed to emerge. Locke then takes a look at some trends, including the tendency toward moving "city-ward," and says these are not because of poor or even violent conditions in the south nor of the industry in the north. Instead, he attributes this…

    • 1834 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    control. Really, it’s just like bullying in many schools, but one hundred times worse. In “The New Negro”, Alain Locke has many important ideas and thoughts about society and the treatment of African Americans. He shows you what every life of a black American was like in the 1920’s. Many of the ideas that he writes are shown in Richard Wright’s Black Boy. “So for generations in the mind of America, the Negro has been more of a formula than a human being-a something to be argued about, condemned or defended…

    • 1063 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Negro

    • 2802 Words
    • 12 Pages

    cases the employers of Negroes in common labor, in which most of them are now engaged, assert that there is no hope for advancement of Negroes in their employ because Negroes will not work under foremen of their own color. In other words, the average Negro has not yet developed to the point that one is willing to take orders from another of his own race. While it is true that such an answer is often given as a mere excuse for not placing Negroes in responsible positions when it can be done without…

    • 2802 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Good Essays