New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration In The Age Of Colorblindness

Satisfactory Essays
Alexander, Michelle. 2010. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of
Colorblindness. New York : [Jackson, Tenn.]: New Press ; HV9950 .A437 2010

The Birth of Slavery in the US
1. In the 17th century labor for plantations was based on indentured servitude.
2. 1675 Bacon's Rebellion
3. By 1770 "By the mid-1770s, the system of bond labor had been thoroughly transformed into a racial caste system predicated on slavery.
"Racial division was a consequence, not a precondition of slavery, but once it was instituted it became detached from its initial function and acquired a social potency all its own.”
Loïc Wacquant, “America’s New ‘Peculiar Institution’: On the Prison as Surrogate Ghetto,”
Theoretical Criminology 4, no. 3 (2000)
…show more content…
Emancipation Proclamation 1863
"Following the Civil War, it was unclear what institutions, laws, or customs would be necessary to maintain white control now that slavery was gone. Nonetheless, as numerous historians have shown, the development of a new racial order became the consuming passion for most white
Southerners. Rumors of a great insurrection terrified whites, and blacks increasingly came to be viewed as menacing and dangerous. In fact, the current stereotypes of black men as aggressive, unruly predators can be traced to this period, when whites feared that an angry mass of black men might rise up and attack them or rape their women." [Michelle Alexander, Cornel West, The
New Jim Crow]
2. 14th Amendment 1868
3. 15th Amendment 1870
4. "Black Codes" in South
"As expressed by one Alabama planter: “We have the power to pass stringent police laws to govern the Negroes—this is a blessing—for they must be controlled in some way or white people cannot live among them.” While some of these codes were intended to establish systems of peonage resembling slavery, others foreshadowed Jim Crow laws by prohibiting, among other things, interracial seating in the first-class sections of railroad cars and by segregating
…show more content…
Reconstruction 1863-1877 (Disputed election of 1876 was given to Republican Hayes, but an agreement to withdraw federal troops from the South and an end to reconstruction left the Democrats in control of the South for more than a century.)

The Birth of Jim Crow in the US
7. Plessy v. Ferguson – "separate but equal" standard set – 1896

8. Three philosophies of race during and after reconstruction
a. Liberal – paternalistic emphasis on stigma of segregation and hypocrisy of government b. Conservative – blames liberals for pushing blacks too far and warned blacks that things could be worse under the Redeemers
c. Radical – populist movement of poor whites and blacks against planters, railroads, and big business
"The Populists took direct aim at the conservatives, who were known as comprising a party of privilege, and they achieved a stunning series of political victories throughout the

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