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New England Colonies Dbq Analysis

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New England Colonies Dbq Analysis
Jorge Zankiz
New England vs. Chesapeake Colonies Throughout the 16th century and into the 17th century the Americas started to become very popular settlement areas, especially North America's east coast. This area was colonized by migrating English that either fled from England because of religious persecution, the wish of starting a new life with their families or were in the pursuit of gold and wealth. The decision people made between those two choices(religion and family go together)was what shaped each region, the New England colonies region and the Chesapeake region. Although these colonies were founded by mostly people of English origin each region had a different view on everything; economic view and intention, different social thoughts
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These were the places in which the Separatists, Puritans and basically all Christians who were in pursuit for religious freedom or seeking the start a new life settled in. The list of emigrants in Doc B shows the amount of people that came over with their families, most of them with young kids, Joseph Hull and his family, Timothy Tabor and his family, Robert Lovell and his family, and the list just goes on. Due to the fact that these people just came with the plan of establishing themselves into a new place where they could live according to their rules they didn't have quite a big vision on making money. Economically speaking the people from the New England Colonies didn't grow as much as the ones at Chesapeake. " We must uphold a familiar commerce together in all meekness, gentleness, patience, and liberality. We must delight in each other, make others' conditions our own, rejoice together, mourn together, labor and suffer together, always having before our eyes our commission and community in the work..."(Doc A). The reader can notice that the commerce in the New England colonies didn't grow was much because just inner commerce was encouraged, the work for sustainability, there wasn't much large scale production. Large scale farming was not encouraged, instead people worked in artisan- industries like shipbuilding, printing and …show more content…
In the New England colonies the government was based on a town system and the laws and choosing of leaders influenced by religion."This court... in the interim recommends [that] all tradesmen and laborers consider the religious end of their callings, which is that receiving such moderate profit as may enable them to serve God and their neighbors with their arts and trade comfortably..."(Doc E) The town system in this region was based on the appointing of a local authority and monthly held meetings in the town hall(most people in these towns were educated people). People knew what was going on in their towns and the decisions that were being made as well as their vote on problems and their ability to call for oppression. The officials and selected authorities were mostly church related people due to the strong faith people had in these

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