Natural Law Theory

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Natural Law is an absolute law that it sets the same laws for all people whenever, implying that everything has a meaning and a purpose leading into a good life. Natural law theory is basically Teleological, as it is aims at our eudemonia, violating it goes against human nature and is therefore immoral. Though all three philosopher's ideas are similar in connecting to life, but the main purpose and reason is different. Aristotle believed that natural law was set in humans contradicting Aquinas, that natural law is based on reason and God must have made human nature based on reason as well as contradicting Locke’s belief for human rights.
Aquinas’ theory of Natural Law, is based on moral laws sent by God, which applies in all situations at
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Aquinas supported Aristotle’s idea of there being an efficient and final cause to everything that happens. He believed that God was the efficient cause for the existence of human nature. Aquinas believes that there are four main precepts of life given to us by God, to live, knowledge, procreation and social relations. These precepts are absolute because they apply the same for everybody in all situations and are written on our hearts. He believed that following the primary precepts will be pleasing to God. Aquinas believed that there is a Natural Law inside of everyone making human nature essentially good, however humans can sin because they may confuse real good with apparent good. For instance, when Osama Bin Laden attacked the two Towers he thought this way he is rescuing and defending Islam and this is the reason for what he did. Though killing is against all societies and Islam and Christianity, but people think they are acting for goodness. People are defining the goodness in their own perspective, not as a whole. In apposition real good is achieved with the right use of reason and it leads us to perfection for example, helping an elderly person to pass the road not caring about what people may think just caring about the eudemonia happiness of the elder person. It them feel good about …show more content…
Acting positively, yet for the wrong reasons is to perform a good exterior act but thinking of the motive behind the act. For instance, helping an elderly person across the road related to a great exterior act, however just to impress a friend relating it to the motive behind the act which is a bad exterior act. While the end that Aquinas’s values are to please God, Aristotle believes that the most ideal ways in which we act are leading us towards satisfaction toward the entire society. Moreover, it is human nature to attempt to impress others, but also in each person of us there is an intrinsic good.
In conclusion all the intrinsic goods by Aquinas relate to human nature and all of them are consequences of the other. Life depends on God’s reasoning of human existence without human there will be no life. Without procreation there won’t be human, without human there won’t be life which depends on the existence of both sex. In order of success of procreation each person has to love and respect the other. Respect comes from knowledge. Succeeding in gaining highest level of knowledge is to succeed in social relations without doing anything just to impress

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