Native American Relations: Early Colonial-Indian Cooperation And Conflict

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Native American relations. Early colonial-Indian relations were an uneasy mix of cooperation and conflict. On the other were a long series of difficult, skirmishes and wars, which almost invariably resulted in an Indian defeat and further loss of land. Although Native Americans benefitted from access to new technology and trade, the disease and thirst for land which the early settlers also brought posed a serious challenge to the Indian's long-established way of life. Those Indians who traded initially had significant advantage over rivals who did not. Some friendly natives were no longer

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