Musa Acuminata

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Musa acuminata
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For cultivated bananas, see Banana. Musa acuminata | | Scientific classification | Kingdom: | Plantae | Clade: | Angiosperms | Clade: | Monocots | Clade: | Commelinids | Order: | Zingiberales | Family: | Musaceae | Genus: | Musa | Species: | M. acuminata | Binomial name | Musa acuminata
Colla, 1820 | Subspecies | See text | | Original native ranges of the ancestors of modern edible bananas. M. acuminata is shown in green and M. balbisiana in orange.[1] | Synonyms[2] | * Musa cavendishii Lamb. * Musa chinensis Sweet, nom. nud. * Musa corniculata Kurz * Musa nana Lour. * Musa × sapientum var. suaveolens (Blanco) Malag. * Musa rumphiana Kurz * Musa simiarum Kurz * Musa sinensis Sagot ex Baker * And see text |
Musa acuminata is a species of wild banana native to Southeast Asia. It is the progenitor of modern edible bananas, along with Musa balbisiana.[3] First cultivated by humans around 8000 years ago[4][5] it is one of the earliest examples of domesticated plants.
Contents
* 1 Taxonomy and nomenclature * 2 Description * 3 Ecology * 4 Distribution * 5 Domestication * 6 Ornamental * 7 Subspecies * 8 See also * 9 References
Taxonomy and nomenclature
Musa acuminata belongs to section Musa (formerly Eumusa) of the genus Musa. It belongs to the family Musaceae of the order Zingiberales.[2] It is divided into several subspecies (see section below).
Musa acuminata was first described by the Italian botanist Luigi Aloysius Colla in the book Memorie della Reale Accademia delle Scienze di Torino (1820).[6][7] Although other authorities have published various names for this species and its hybrids mistaken for different species (notably Musa sapientum by Linnaeus which is now



References: 1. ^ a b c Edmond de Langhe & Pierre de Maret (2004). "Tracking the banana: its significance in early agriculture". In Jon G. Hather. The Prehistory of Food: Appetites for Change. Routledge. p. 372. ISBN 978-0-203-20338-5. 2. ^ a b "Musa acuminata Colla, 1820". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN) online database. Retrieved June 5, 2011. 7. ^ a b Deborah A. Karamura (1999). Numerical taxonomic studies of the East African Highland bananas (Musa AAA-East Africa) in Uganda. Bioversity International. p. 18. ISBN 978-2-910810-31-3. 9. ^ a b c d e f N.W. Simmonds (1962). "Where our bananas come from". New Scientist (Reed Business Information) 16 (307): 36–39. ISSN 0262-4079. Retrieved June 11, 2011. 10. ^ Markku Häkkinen & Edmond De Langhe (2001). Musa acuminata in Northern Borneo. International Network for the Improvement of Banana and Plantain (INIBAP). Retrieved June 11, 2011. 11. ^ a b c d S. D. Doijode (2001). Seed storage of horticultural crops. Routledge. pp. 69–71. ISBN 978-1-56022-901-8. 13. ^ a b Michael Pillay & Abdou Tenkouano (2011). Banana Breeding and Production. CRC Press. ISBN 978-1-4398-0017-1. 14. ^ a b Hean Chooi Ong (2008). Vegetables for Health and Healing. Utusan Publications. p. 38. ISBN 978-967-61-2102-8. 17. ^ Noël Kingsbury (2009). Hybrid: the history and science of plant breeding. University of Chicago Press. p. 31–32. ISBN 978-0-226-43704-0. 18. ^ a b c Jeffrey William Daniells & Suzanne L. Sharrock (2001). Musalogue, a catalogue of Musa germplasm: diversity in the genus Musa. Bioversity International. ISBN 978-2-910810-42-9. 19. ^ a b c A. T. G. Elzebroek & Koop Wind (2001). Guide to cultivated plants. CABI. pp. 35–38. ISBN 978-1-84593-356-2. 20. ^ R.V. Valmayor (2000). "Cooking bananas - Classification, production and utilization in South-East Asia". Infomusa (International Network for the Improvement of Banana and Plantain) 9 (1): 28–30. ISSN 1023-0076. Retrieved June 5, 2011.

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