Multiculturalism

Topics: World War II, Immigration, Australia Pages: 5 (1769 words) Published: July 12, 2013
Migrant cultures have significantly contributed to Australian society since World War II because their culture has directly influenced the main stream of Australia’s culture. “The term ‘multiculturalism has served the Australian community well and best describes our positive acceptance of the reality and significance of our cultural diversity and the proactive approach to addressing the challenges and opportunities arising from it.” (National Multicultural Advisory Council, 1999) Multiculturalism is a term that was introduced into the political bureaucratic language decades ago, and it has since become synonymous with diversity and tolerance in Australia. As well as this, it is important to acknowledge that Australia has not always been tolerant of ethnic or linguistic diversity in the past. Australia is and will remain a multicultural society. From 1945 to 1949, Australia established the Federal Department of Immigration and thereby launched a large scale immigration program. Australia was in urgent need of a larger population for the purposes of defence and development. It is hypothesised that migrant cultures have significantly contributed to Australian society since World War II because their culture has directly influenced the main stream of Australia’s culture. Social order, economy, culture, economics and prosperity have considerably contributed and shaped  Australian society in the modern day and throughout the years. “While Australian multiculturalism values and celebrates diversity, it is not an ‘anything goes’ concept since it is built on core societal values of mutual respect, tolerance and harmony, the rule of law and our democratic principle and institutions. It is also based on an overriding commitment to Australia.” (Natural Multicultural Advisory Council, 1999). This essay will discuss the predominant reason for migration post World War II, the specific contribution of migrant in the immediate era of Australia, the contribution of their culture in Australian society today and how have migrants contribute to the Australian economy after World War II to present. The predominant reason for migration post World War II was the theory of “Populate or Perish,” this theory suggested that without a larger population, Australia would perish due to the numerous threats during the War and that Australia could not defend itself. This led way to a large-scale immigration program which was supported by virtually all sections of the community and fuelled by the post-war economic boom that had occurred. This soon led to the Federal Department of Immigration being established in 1945 and the first Minister for Immigration being employed. It was estimated that Australia needed a 1% annual population increase to actually survive in this post war world. Australia’s government however was not the only ones who wanted people to migrate, many displaced Europeans who became displaced during the war also wanted to migrate. To ensure that Australia would receive decent immigrants, they created free and assisted passage schemes for the UK. As well as this, various other international agreements were created with various countries. One of the things that Australia had over other countries was that it had enormous potential for growth, it could offer people who wished to leave Europe and the war-torn countries and it was viewed as an optimistic future. One specific culture that came for reasons due to their country were the Irish due to the famine in their homeland. The result of “Populate or Perish” was that in the thirty years from 1945-1975, Australia’s population almost doubled from seven and a half to thirteen million. “Populate or Perish,” and the positive Australian outlook has been a very important reason in the development of Australian immigration The specific contribution of migrants in the immediate era of mid-20th century has been very instrumental in the development of many of Australia’s industries. One of the major...

Bibliography: Websites
Wikipedia, 2012. Post-War Immigration to Australia; www.wikipedia.com/wiki/ Post-war_immigration_to_australia (accessed 15/10/12). This source provides valid background information and is reasonably accurate however it does need to be validated by other sources.
Books:
Cameron, K. and Lawless,  J. and Young, C. et al. 2000, Investigating Australia 20th Century History, Nelson, Victoria.  (accessed 18.10.12). This source provided good overall information, particularly on the Australian economy.
Dept. Immigration & Citizenship. 2009, Fact Sheet 4.http://www.immi.gov.au/media/fact-sheets/04fifty.htm (accessed 15.10.12) This source provides valid, accurate information which is very useful to this essay.
Dept. Immigration & Citizenship. 2009, Immigration to Australia during 20th Century.http://www.immi.gov.au/media/publications/statistics/federation/timeline1.pdf (accessed 15.10.12) This source provided accurate and valid and accurate information which gave decent information as to why in some cases as well as for other timeframes.
Healey, J. 2000, Multiculturalism: Issues in Society, The Spinney Press, Balmain. (accessed 25.10.12). This book gave relatively decent background information which is valid, it provides extensive information for certain topics.
King, R. et al. 2010, The Atlas of Human Migration, Earthscan, UK. (accessed 25.10.12). This source provides decent and accurate information for the broader community, however not completely dedicated to Australia, so there was very little information sourced from this book.
Legrain, P. 2006, Immigrants – Your Country Needs Them, Little Brown, Great Britain. (accessed 25.10.12). This source provides relatively relevant information, however does not specifically target Australia and so little information was used in this source.
Welsh, K. 2001, The Changing Face of Australia, Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest. (accessed 25.10.12). This book, dedicated to Australia, provided accurate and valid information relevant to this assignment.
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