Much Ado About Nothing and Good Will Hunting - Self-Discovery

Topics: Love, Low-angle shot, Good Will Hunting Pages: 3 (1035 words) Published: August 26, 2013
Self-discovery relies on the learning from others.Self-discovery is defined as “The act or process of achieving understanding or knowledge of oneself.”We all interact with many people who play an influential role in our lives. These people could challenge, criticize, motivate, inspire, or judge us. Through this, we may develop a deeper understanding of ourselves and our abilities. By reflecting upon difficult or unhappy interactions with another person, we might even be able to see these interactions with new eyes. The idea of counterfeiting, in the sense of presenting a false face to the world, appears frequently throughout Shakespeare’s much ado about nothing. A particularly rich and complex example of counterfeiting occurs as Leonato, Claudio, and Don Pedro pretend that Beatrice is head over heels in love with Benedick "If we can do this, Cupid is no longer an archer; his glory shall be ours, for we are the only love-gods" The trick will lead Benedick and Beatrice not into deception but into self-discovery. Upon hearing Claudio and Don Pedro discussing Beatrice’s desire for him, Benedick vows to be “horribly in love with her,” He is the entertainer, indulging in witty hyperbole to express his feelings. This change in attitude seems most evident when Benedick challenges Claudio to duel to the death over Claudio’s accusation as to Hero’s unchaste behavior. There can be no doubt at this point that Benedick has discovered his true feelings and switched his allegiances entirely over to Beatrice. When Claudio silently agrees to let Don Pedro take his place to woo Hero, it is quite possible that he does so not because he is too shy to woo the woman himself, but because he must accede to Don Pedro’s authority in order to stay in Don Pedro’s good favour. When Claudio believes that Don Pedro has deceived him and wooed Hero not for Claudio but for himself, he cannot drop his polite civility, even though he is full of despair.He remains polite and nearly silent even...
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