Motown

Good Essays
It’s the Same Old Song As we progressed through discovering the art Motown, we start to notice patterns on some aspects of the Motown artists. The way they dress being a major one, as well as their style of dance movements, hand gestures, and facial expressions. The style of these well-known artist was iconic, most of the males wore matching suits with an unbuttoned collar. Females generally wore matching dresses with what we would consider today classic 60’s women’s hairstyle, with the straight fringe covering the forehead and a big bump on top of the head. The band that my group and I chose had 5 members which was perfect because we were five in total which made complete sense. We all admire their song “Get Ready” which is one of their hit singles and well recognized piece of work. In the end we decided to stick with “Ain’t too proud to beg” with more powerful lyrics and classic soul passion that truly embraces the meaning of Motown music. We carefully analyzed their structure and attempted to embody their movements and replicate The Temptations to the best of our ability. My group knew we couldn’t copy the whole dance, so we decided to take part of their routine and continue t repeat them as each of us went to the front and portrayed ourselves as the lead singer. When it comes to dress attire we all decided to wear khaki pants with a white button down shirt and a grey coat. Somewhat a little tacky but we were convinced it will work, as long as we are matching and constantly remain in sync. As we continued to analyze the Temptations choreography in the live performance we notice that they are in constant sync and in perfect harmony. The backup singers tend to do a lot of snapping and a couple of turns while the lead vocal does a lot of hand gestures without getting too intimate but still putting a lot emotion and feeling on his voice projection. The Lead singer does make himself standout from the rest of the bunch but does not go all out. He

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Motown NHD

    • 1508 Words
    • 1 Page

    Berry Gordy was a leader in the field of being the founder of Motown music and was responsible for the success of many artists. Gordy's legacy of Motown music communicated and brought together a racially divided country and segregated society, around the world, touching all people of all ages and races. He did what many people of his time believed could never be done; he brought black music into millions of white Americans' homes, helping both black artists and their culture gain acceptance, and…

    • 1508 Words
    • 1 Page
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Motown Influences

    • 387 Words
    • 2 Pages

    influenced American music throughout the years, Motown has been the most influential. Motown is the most significant era in popular music because it completely broke racial barriers and created a style of catchy music that lives on today. Before Motown, music was old, tired, and segregated. Jazz had been popular for so many years, it was time for something new and that’s exactly why Berry Gordy began the pop culture sensation that we know as Motown. Before Motown, artists were not judged by their talent…

    • 387 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Motown Music

    • 428 Words
    • 2 Pages

    musician or ensemble, or composed for a particular instrument or group of instruments, voice or choir (Wikipedia). Founded by Berry Gordy Jr, Motown is a record company in Detroit, Michigan, United States that was incorporated on April 14, 1960. With a variety of genres incorporated within the record company, from 1961 to 1971, Motown had 110 top 10 hits. Motown acts were enjoying a widespread popularity among black/white audiences alike where William “Smokey” Robinson stated “Into the '60s, I was…

    • 428 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Essay On Motown

    • 579 Words
    • 3 Pages

    brought hits from all kinds of different singers and groups, it was called Motown. Motown was founded by Berry Gordy on January 12, 1959. Berry Gordy had borrowed eight hundred dollars from his family to start a record company. The name, a combination of motor and town, had also become a nickname for Detroit. Gordy applied the principles he learned in the factory for production of records and creation of musical groups. Motown played an important role in the racial integration of popular music as an…

    • 579 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Motown Records marketed their releases as an all-inclusive “Sound of Young America” and succeeded in selling their records to both white and black audiences. Motown’s focus on the subject matter of the songs, the presentation of their artists to the public, and the perception that they remained at least neutral on political and social issues aided in their ability to crossover. This is the accepted narrative in the retelling and analysis of Motown Records in the 1960s. Suzanne Smith, in Dancing…

    • 957 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Motown Book Review

    • 1518 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Apology”: The Motown Sound and the Politics of Black Culture Chapter 4 in the book Dancing in the Street: Motown and the Cultural Politics of Detroit by Suzanne E. Smith focuses primarily on Motown’s popularity and “the question of the relationship of the negro artist and his or her art to black struggle”(Smith, 139). Langston Hughes believed that “all forms of black culture, including popular music, confronted these issues (black struggle) in some way during the civil rights years, and Motown music was…

    • 1518 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Brief History of Motown Motown Records was the first African-American-owned music label and featured the first African-American performers to achieve success with mainstream white audiences. Motown's impact on 1960s culture played a major role in the integration of pop music. In producing hit records for African-American artists such as Diana Ross and The Supremes, The Temptations, Stevie Wonder and many others, Gordy did his part in the fight for racial equality at a time when King and other civil…

    • 375 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Motown Museum in Detroit is truly a motivational part of America's history; it stood for another way for African American voices to be heard on a much greater scale both national and even world wide. Motown has become America's pop soul music for anyone and everyone. The birth of Motown music came to be in a small recording studio aptly named Hitsville, U.S.A. Barry Gordy, who came from a large middle class family had borrowed money in order. The main stage of Motown music came from a small…

    • 589 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Motown music was created in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan in the late 1950s. Motown was born when Berry Gordy founded his record company Tamla Records, a branch of which was called Motown. Gordy, an entrepreneur and visionary, helped write and produce many early songs of the type. The company became a big hit in the midwest and eventually all across America. Gordy, being an african-american man in the 1950s, was a huge believer in Civil Rights. He recorded and put out Martin Luther King, Jr's…

    • 1078 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    rivals. They were Motown and Stax records. These two companies were big for their times. The two giants were big and had a lot of artists of great music play for them. Motown and Stax had very different ways of running their business. Motown had Barry Gordy, who made the artists go to a school to teach them how act. "... But a wealth of new music by african-american performers flourished during this period. Among the most important devlopments was the music that came out of Motown Records- an idependent…

    • 250 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays