Motivational Interviewing Model

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Motivational Interviewing vs. Johnson Institute Model
I chose to compare the Motivational Interviewing Model vs. The Johnson Model because The Johnson is the oldest and the one the was used the most until recently. The Johnson Model was designed by an Episcopal priest whose name was Vernon Johnson because of his interest he studied addiction and what addiction was; He was also interested in stopping the addiction. The goal for Mr. Johnson was to avoid any death caused by any addiction. Mr. Johnson’s life goal was to help addicts reach their sobriety. He chose and used 200 recovering alcoholics for his study. He studied them in order for him to find a correct method and the method that would be a success. The study was made based on one
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In order for family members not to go after the addict and destroy them with blame and hurtful feelings as well as bad memories, the Johnson method encouraged caring as the priority. In the Johnson model confrontation by family members is necessary. Members of the family are encouraged to confront the addict with letters that state in detail writing how much they love for the addict and the destruction the addiction was causing them and the family. Dr. Johnson had the members of a family writing letters to the addict listing the good in them and the bad due to the addiction and at the end there is also a summary of consequences and what will take place if the addict does not clean up before their life or family matters got worst in everyone’s life. The main focus in the Johnson Method is based in confrontation to the addict and also based on motivation in order to be able to encourage them to change their way of thinking for their sake and also for those who surround them, they motivate them by making them think what it would bring to everyone involved in the addict’s life mainly the family. Dr. Johnson wanted the confrontation of the addict, in doing so this way would allow their defenses to be low and the addict would capture the severity of …show more content…
When the defenses are raised it is impossible to have the addict listen because if blame and insult is thrown that would only cause the addict to get defensive when being attacked which causes interruption to the purpose of intervention and ultimately the addict stops listening. The plan for sobriety fails because they are so overwhelm that they no longer want the option of treatment because their defenses are so high that the only thing they want at that time is to finish the intervention and that point nothing will convince them to change their mind and nothing is accomplished at the end. There are seven components to the Johnson Method which is the Intervention Practice. The seven components are as follows according to his model: 1. Known as the Team, this team consists of a counselor or therapist specialized in intervention methods. It also includes family members, acquaintances, friends, as well as anyone involved in the addict’s life. 2. Planning, during planning, at this time of intervention it is determined the exact components of the letters, exactly what is going to be said through

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