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Motherhood Issues

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Motherhood Issues
Motherhood Issue’s

In researching material on single mothers and teen mothers, the true problems with single mother households, and the problems, I found a few pleasing issues in the resources I collected which are worth mention. The first is the general statistics of sexual activity and early pregnancy. The second deals with the contrary views of the effects of single mother families on the children. The third deals with the financial issues of normal poorness amongst single mothers, and the fourth focuses on global issues. Single motherhood is an issue of human rights for a few key reasons. In the United States, the title of "single mother" creates several guesses about the mother's skills to care for her children, the possible negative emotional and mental effects on the children, and leads right to the label of "sick family". To add to the issue of the stamp of dislike society gives single mother families, many of them in the U.S. are not receiving the aid that they should be. On top of raising one or more children without the help of a second party, many women also have to struggle to stay out of debt. It is nearly impossible for a woman with an average salary to support children on her own, including the expenses of school, clothes, food, transportation, and other needs; and this is just the middle range of the spectrum. The reasons why U.S. women are increasingly becoming single mothers are teen pregnancy, father disappearances, adoption, and the biggest of all, divorce. Reasons for single motherhood become more crazy and difficult in their results once investigations are done into other countries. Not only are single mothers a hazard and disgrace in many areas of the third world, they are also often illegal. In many places, as soon as a women gets pregnant out of marriage, she is charged with prostitution, and is forced to spend time in jail or pay fines for the crime. These charges are made even if the woman has been raped. These charges are baseless,

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