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Montgomery Bus Boycott Thesis

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Montgomery Bus Boycott Thesis
The Montgomery Bus Boycott The Montgomery Bus Boycott was started by a woman who stood up against unjust segregation by sitting down. It officially started on December 5,1955, because an African American woman named Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man. It was started by the Montgomery Improvement Association, who created themselves for this purpose only. It continued for 381 days, a little over a year, until bus segregation was declared unconstitutional. The Montgomery Bus Boycott started a wave of nonviolent protest against the segregation between whites and blacks. Rosa Parks was arrested on December 1, 1955 at 7:00 pm, because she refused to give up her seat on a bus for a white man to sit down. She was sitting in the …show more content…
They decided to create a carpool system to help transport some people to and from work. T.J. Jemison, the person who developed the carpool system for the huge bus boycott in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, helped develop the carpool for the massive boycott in Montgomery. Churches bought vans and station wagons to help transport people. Also, it was encouraged that if you owned a car, to help transport people. Everyone who needed a ride would meet in one of many spots around the city, so they could be conveyed to work. It worked well for the people needing transportation.
Throughout the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Supreme Court’s attention was caught, so a court case was held called Browder vs. Gayle. It tried if bus segregation was unconstitutional or not. The court case was held on June 5, 1956. On November 13, 1956, it was affirmed that bus segregation was unconstitutional. On December 20, 1956, the protesters stopped boycotting and rode the buses again. Finally, the buses of Montgomery, Alabama were integrated.
The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a very significant part of the civil rights movement, because it started the popularity of nonviolent protests. Both it’s start and end made history that will never be forgotten. It was a protest that stood up against discrimination by not standing

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