modern novel

Better Essays
William Faulkne

Faulkner in 1949
Born
William Cuthbert Falkner
September 25, 1897
New Albany, Mississippi, U.S.
Died
July 6, 1962 (aged 64)
Byhalia, Mississippi, U.S.
Language
English
Nationality
American
Period
1919–1962
Notable work(s)
The Sound and the Fury
As I Lay Dying
Light in August
Absalom, Absalom!
A Rose for Emily
Notable award(s)
Nobel Prize in Literature
1949
Pulitzer Prize for Fiction
1955, 1963
Spouse(s)
Estelle Oldham (1929–1962)

Signature

William Cuthbert Faulkner (born Falkner, September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962), also known as Will Faulkner, was an American writer and Nobel Prize laureate from Oxford, Mississippi. Faulkner worked in a variety of written media, including novels, short stories, a play, poetry, essays and screenplays. He is primarily known and acclaimed for his novels and short stories, many of which are set in the fictional Yoknapatawpha County, a setting Faulkner created based on Lafayette County, where he spent most of his life, and Holly Springs/Marshall County.[1]
Faulkner is one of the most important writers in both American literature generally and Southern literature specifically. Though his work was published as early as 1919, and largely during the 1920s and 1930s, Faulkner was relatively unknown until receiving the 1949 Nobel Prize in Literature. Two of his works, A Fable (1954) and his last novel The Reivers (1962), won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.[2] In 1998, the Modern Library ranked his 1929 novel The Sound and the Fury sixth on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century; also on the list were As I Lay Dying (1930) and Light in August (1932). Absalom, Absalom! (1936) is often included on similar lists.
Biography
Faulkner was born William Cuthbert Falkner in New Albany, Mississippi, the first of four sons of Murry Cuthbert Falkner (August 17, 1870 – August 7, 1932) and Maud Butler (November 27, 1871 – October 19, 1960).[3] He had three younger brothers:

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    Modern Novel Features

    • 1705 Words
    • 5 Pages

    various reasons which have made the novel the most popular literary form today, let us consider the main characteristics of the modern novel. In the first place, we can say that it is realistic as opposed toidealistic. The ‘realistic’ writer is one who thinks that truth to observed facts—facts about the outer world, or facts about his own feelings—is the great thing, while the ‘idealistic’ writer wants rather to create a pleasant and edifying picture. The modern novelist is ‘realistic’ in this sense…

    • 1705 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Theorist of Modern Novel

    • 56867 Words
    • 228 Pages

    THEORISTS OF THE MODERNIST NOVEL In the early twentieth century the modernist novel exploded literary conventions and expectations, challenging representations of reality, consciousness and identity.These novels were not simply creative masterpieces but also crucial articulations of revolutionary developments in critical thought. In this volume Deborah Parsons traces the developing modernist aesthetic in the thought and writings of James Joyce, Dorothy Richardson and Virginia Woolf. Considering…

    • 56867 Words
    • 228 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner is a very deep and emotionally touching novel. The book revolves around the life of Amir, the protagonist, as he struggles against his conscience and finally triumphs after redeeming himself. Mr. Hosseini weaves the tale using an excellent arsenal of techniques. He uses some brilliant similes and metaphors throughout the book. However, juxtaposition is easily his most effective technique. What is juxtaposition? Wikipedia defines it as “synonymous with contrast…

    • 526 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Katy Lu WR150 J7 Professor Kent Love in Modern Novel Paper three Final draft Apr. 17, 2012 The Sun also rises: A Continuously Reversed Cosine Tragedy In Gunther Schomigalle’s “How people go to hell: Pessimism, Tragedy, and Affinity to Schopenhauer in The Sun Also Rises”, he mentions, “I believe Hemingway was right when, in letters to his editor, he called The Sun Also Rises ‘a book as tragic as that’ (Reynolds 45) or ‘a damn tragedy’ (Lynn 333)” (Schomigalle 10). Some may…

    • 3081 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Novel

    • 1265 Words
    • 6 Pages

    A novel is a long prose narrative that describes fictional characters and events in the form of a sequential story, usually. The genre has historical roots in the fields of medieval and early modern romance and in the tradition of the novella. The latter, an Italian word used to describe short stories, supplied the present generic English term in the 18th century. Further definition of the genre is historically difficult. The construction of the narrative, the plot, the relation to reality, the…

    • 1265 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    novels

    • 738 Words
    • 8 Pages

    NOVELS, SOCIETY AND HISTORY S.NO. Name Novel Features Other specifications 1 Samuel Richardson Pamela Epistolary novel-(Written in the form of a series of letters) 2 Henry Fielding Tom Jones (1749) Costly for poor 3 Charles Dickens Pickwick Papers Serialized in a magazine known as “All the Round Year” Serialization allowed readers to relish the suspense. 4 Leo Tolstoy War and peace Russian novelist who wrote extensively on rural life and community. 5 Charles Dickens…

    • 738 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    become progressively unsettled even as it has narrowed, yet the term has justified itself to be an unshakeable one in our moral lexicon. In Susan Neiman’s novel, “Evil in Modern Thought” she traces philosophy's struggle with evil in the past. The novel is constructed specifically around two events the Neiman deems as the”central poles” of the modern era; both of which threw philosophers’ comprehension of evil into perplexity: Lisbon and Auschwitz.…

    • 330 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Novel

    • 912 Words
    • 4 Pages

    New Yorker editor, and lifelong Dickens reader, gives us the 10 best books from the master. For more on the book, check out our Q&A with Gottlieb. Charles Dickens left us fifteen novels, and in an ideal world everyone would read all of them. (Well, maybe not – Barnaby Rudge is a tired and tiresome historical novel that the young Dickens kept putting off writing until contractual obligations forced him to finish it.) His first published book was Sketches by Boz – a collection of short pieces that…

    • 912 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Novel

    • 616 Words
    • 3 Pages

    2.1 Background Novel is a long prose narrative that describes fictional characters and events in the form of a sequential story. In general, novels consist of many different genres, such as adventure, science fiction, family, fantasy, and so on. In this paper, I will analyze a novel titled 20.000 Leagues Under the Sea. I analyze this novel because this novel has a genre of adventure, and I like everything related to an adventure, particularly an adventure under the sea. This novel tells about a very…

    • 616 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Novel

    • 3291 Words
    • 14 Pages

    Question: Write on the theme of ‘forgiveness’ that you find in the novel, ‘The Curse’. Lee Su Ann, the writer of the novel ‘The Curse’ had brought up many themes in her writing. One of the themes that I liked very much in this novel is ‘forgiveness’ which was clearly portrayed in Azreen’s character. As we know from the beginning, Azreen is a very outspoken, aggressive and stubborn character but towards the ending of the story she had learnt to forgive others. Azreen was very much influenced…

    • 3291 Words
    • 14 Pages
    Good Essays