Modern Architecture: Frank Lloyd Wright

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Thesis
Modern architecture is new ideologies of architectural that show up in many Western countries in the decade after industrial revolution I. It was based on the rational use of modern materials, the principles of functionalist planning, and the reject of what it is exists and miscellaneous decoration. This style has been generally designated as modern, although the labels International style and functionalism have also been used.
In rudimentary architecture the human presence can seem subject to the domination of nature. Architecture cannot disengage it self from the natural and human factors, it never do so, it function rather is to bring nature ever close to us. Everything should be on the premise of respect for the natural. And consider
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Fallingwater is the name of a very special house that is built over a waterfall Fallingwater was built between 1936 and 1939.
Robie House is name of another very special house that is built in the campus of the University of Chicago in the neighborhood of Hyde Park in Chicago, Illinois, It was designed and built between 1908 and 1910. Both of them are become famous, and today it is a National Historic Landmark.
Wright described his architectural style as "organic"--in harmony with nature, and though Fallingwater reveals vocabulary drawn from the International style in certain aspects, this country house exhibits so many features typical of Wright's natural style, the house very much engaged with its
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The house is divided into two wings, keeping the public areas toward the street and the service areas near the innermost sections of the house. The floor composition is based on two adjacent horizontal bars that are mixed in a central space which are anchored by the vertical column of the fireplace. The space is divided into two areas, the living and dining areas separated by fireplace, but wisely connected. On both ends of this space the two long galleries form triangular areas that are more intimate for relaxing and dinning. And the bedroom is at the second level.

The significance of Wright's design of the Robie House is that he neglected the conventional ideation of a house as a box containing a smaller "boxes" for rooms. By contrast, the interior space is fluid and transparent, allowing the entry of light without obstructing the view. This "explosion of the box" produces the effect of walls unfolding to reveal large, vast

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