Modalities of Hypnotherapy

Powerful Essays
Modalities of Therapy that can be used in Hypnotherapy
By Jody Wood
The history of hypnosis is a bit like a history of breathing. Like breathing, hypnosis is an inherent and universal trait, shared and experienced by all human beings since the dawn of time. It’s only in the last few decades that we’ve come to realise that hypnosis itself hasn’t changed for millennia, but our understanding of it and our ability to control it has changed quite profoundly. The history of hypnosis, then, is really the history of this change in perception (History of Hypnosis, 2012). Although through the ages many rituals and practises from all over the world resemble modern day hypnosis, hypnosis from a western medical point of view started in 18th Century with Franz Mesmer’s work. Mesmer was the first to propose a rational basis for the effects of hypnosis. He was also the first to develop a consistent method for hypnosis, which was passed on to and developed by his followers (History of Hypnosis, 2012). Hypnosis has been defined in many ways. Encarta World English dictionary (1999, p. 927) defines hypnosis as: “ A sleep like condition that can be artificially induced in people, in which they can respond to questions and are very susceptible to suggestion from the hypnotist”. Your Free Dictionary.com (2012, pg 927) describes hypnosis as: “a calm state of altered-consciousness that allows a person to recall memories or be guided to change behaviour”.

So what is Hypnotherapy? Encarta World English dictionary (1999, p. 927) defines Hypnotherapy as “the use of hypnosis in treating illness e.g. in dealing with physical pain or psychological problems”. While I believe both of the above definitions to be true, in my experience of hypnosis and hypnotherapy, neither are completely accurate. I would define Hypnosis as an altered state of consciousness or purposely induced altered state of consciousness. Although it is true that people can respond to questions and are very



References: Centre for Healing and Imagery. (2008). EMDR as a Special Form of Ego State Psychotherapy. Retrieved August 15, 2012, from http://www.centerforhealingandimagery.com Collingwood, J., & Collingwood, C. (2002). What is NLP. Retrieved August 15, 2012, from http://www.inspiritive.com.au/nlp.htm Encarta World English Dictionary. (1999). Pan Macmillan Australia, Bloomsbury Publishing. Falex. (2008). The Free Dictionary: Gale Encyclopaedia of Medicine. Retrieved August 15, 2012, from http://medicaldictionary.thefreedictionary.com/gestalt+therapy History of Hypnosis. (2012). The Magic Of Everyday Trance. Retrieved August 15, 2012, from http://www.historyofhypnosis.org/ Microdot Net. (2008). What Is NLP: History of NLP. Retrieved August 15, 2012, from http://microdot.net/nlp/what/history-of-nlp.shtml Newman, M. (2012). Evolve Life Education & Wellness. East Gosford, Australia. Your Free Dictionary. (2012). LoveToKnow Corp. Retrieved August 15, 2012, from http://www.yourdictionary.com/hypnosis

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