Mitzvot In Judaism

Topics: Judaism, Torah, Talmud Pages: 6 (1371 words) Published: March 17, 2017


Judaism
What are mitzvot, and where can they be found?
Mitzvot are 613 commandments which according to Jewish tradition were given by God to the people Hebrew in the Torah (the first five books of the Old Testament) and resumed and commented in Talmud (Jewish holy book). These mitzvot represent important laws in the Jewish religion that can not be violated. The Mitzvott term is closely related with “good deeds”. Many of these have to do with Temple ritual, which was central to Jewish life and worship when the Torah was written. Others only apply in a theocratic state of Israel.
What does the word Torah literally mean, and how many other meanings can be derived from it?
The word Torah literally means “teaching”, the totality of God’s revelations...

According to Hebrew tradition, Judaism begins with the Covenant between God and Abraham. Over the centuries, there were some formulations of the principles of faith, and even if they differ with regard to some details, they demonstrate a common ideological core. For these formulations, the most authoritative are 'thirteen principles of faith, "XII formulated by Maimonides. The thirteen principles were ignored by most of the Hebrew community for centuries. Over centuries redrafting these principles have been included in poetic form in Hebrew prayer books, and eventually became generally accepted. These principles of faith...

He alone made, makes, and will make all that is created.
I believe by complete faith that the Creator, blessed be His name, is a Unity, and there is no union in any way like Him. He alone is our God, who was, who is, and who is to be.
I believe by complete faith that the Creator, blessed be His name, is not a body, is not affected by physical matter, and nothing whatsoever can compare to Him [or be compared with Him.
I believe by complete faith that the Creator, blessed be His name, is the first and is the last. 
I believe by complete faith that the Creator, blessed be His name, to Him alone is it fitting to make prayer and to another prayer shall not be made.
I believe by complete faith that all the words of the prophets are true.
I believe by complete faith that the prophesy of Moses our teacher, may peace rest upon him, was true and that he was the father of all prophets that preceded him as well as all that came after...
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