Miles Davis Influence On Jazz Music

Satisfactory Essays
Miles Davis was an American Jazz musician back in the 1960s. He was not only a terrific trumpeter, but was also a bandleader and composer. Miles Davis is just one of the people who had a major impact and influence on the Jazz-Rock fusion era and artists in the late 1940s. Unknowingly, Miles Davis would grow and become one of the leading figures in the Jazz world, and would help Jazz-Rock to be brought to the mainstream music

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Question 11 Miles Davis was one of the greatest and most important figures in jazz history. Miles Dewey Davis III was a musician, composer, arranger, producer and bandleader all in one. Davis was at the forefront of almost every major development in jazz after World War 2. He was one of the most influential and innovative musicians of the twentieth century along with Charlie Parker and Louis Armstrong. His versatility landed him at the forefront of bebop, cool jazz, modal, hard bop and fusion…

    • 1762 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    26, 1926 in Alton, Illinois, a true legend of Jazz music was born. Miles Dewey Davis III, son of Miles Dewey Davis II and Cleota Mae Davis, was the middle child in the family. Miles had an older sister, Dorothy Mae Davis and a little brother, Vernon Davis. Both of his parents worked, making enough money live a middle-class lifestyle in a household which was located in a white neighborhood. His dad was a dental surgeon and his mother worked as a music teacher and a violinist, which justifies that…

    • 1926 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The King of Jazz “I’m always thinking about creating. My future starts when I wake up every morning. Everyday I find something creative to do with my life” (Davis 4). Miles Davis is the individual that made jazz the way it is today. Miles Davis still is a leading and influential figure in jazz ( Davis 1). When most people hear the word trumpet, they automatically picture Miles. His weird personality and his bizarre characteristics, make him a legend in the music scene. Davis explored many different…

    • 927 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    <b>Abstract</b> <br>This essay is a discussion of how the way jazz trumpeter Miles Davis changes his way of improvising, looking at two pieces from different times. The solos in the pieces were transcribed by myself and then analysed in detail. From these analyses, several conclusions on the style of improvising were drawn, and then the conclusions from the two pieces were compared. The piece ‘New Rhumba', showed how Davis was using his technical ability to create an impressive solo, but was also…

    • 4157 Words
    • 17 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Miles Davis

    • 1358 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Miles Davis: The music’s right but the approach is wrong. Music listeners everywhere have heard at least a smidgen of the music from “the prince of darkness”. Although Miles Davis, dubbed the “most revered jazz trumpeter of all time, not to mention one of the most important musicians of the 20th century” by Rolling Stone Magazine and known as the birth of cool, attitudes and behaviors we never truly kind and the man was notoriously known as a jerk, his music was of great importance to the jazz…

    • 1358 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Miles Davis

    • 1710 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The Electric Miles Davis Born in Alton, Illinois, Miles Davis grew up in a middle-class family in East St. Louis. Miles Davis took up the trumpet at the age of 13 and was playing professionally two years later. Some of his first gigs included performances with his high school bandand playing with Eddie Randall and the blue Devils. Miles Davis has said that the greatest musical experience of his life was hearing the Billy Eckstine orchestra when it passed through St. Louis. In September…

    • 1710 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jazz Music Influence

    • 223 Words
    • 1 Page

    The birth of jazz music is often accredited to African Americans but both black and white Americans are responsible for its immerse rise in popularity. It is present in black vocals, music-spirituals, work songs, field hollers, and the blues. Jazz united people across the world and had powerful meanings about their lives. Jazz music was completed with a trumpet, clarinet, trombone and section of drums. The music was created with passion inspired by people’s lives. Ragtime was a musical style emerged…

    • 223 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Miles Davis Essay

    • 1141 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Jon Davis Perspectives in American Jazz Ben Martinson December 10, 2009 Miles Davis: The Last Pioneer in American Jazz Miles Davis represents the pinnacle of modern American Jazz. He was one of the foremost pioneers in the inventions of cool jazz, hard bop, free jazz, fusion and techno. He was, arguably one of the most influential figures in music, pushing the boundaries of what was commonly known as jazz into new directions that most people thought was impossible. Davis was born…

    • 1141 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Miles Davis [pic] Miles Davis | | Home > Library > Miscellaneous > Who2 Biographies | | | | |View Poster | | | • Born: 26 May 1926 • Birthplace: Alton, Illinois • Died: 28 September 1991 • Best Known As: Composer/performer of Kind of Blue Name at birth:…

    • 1358 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Drugs and Miles Davis

    • 1424 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Throughout America's music history, the use and abuse of illegal drugs has been widespread, and some great musicians' lives have been utterly devistated and ruined by drugs. Often times it seems as though, in studying their histories, many musicians are falsely led to believe that if they use certain drugs, their playing will improve, or become more creative. Many great musician's lives have been tragicly cut short because of their drug use, and God only knows where some of them would be today had…

    • 1424 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays