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Michael Pollan's An Animal Place

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Michael Pollan's An Animal Place
Trust is one of the most essential feeling that anyone would want in themselves, and in other. Trust gives us the confident to support one’s point of view, and believes. There is no doubt that we can perfectly relate this to Michael Pollan’s essay “An Animal Place”. Pollan addresses the animal rightist claim that animals should be giving more rights, while other think that animals do disserve to have right since they are less intelligent than us humans. Pollan’s main objective is not to persuade his audience to stop eating meat, but rather to study the ethics of eating animals and to find out the way meat is processed by building a sense of trust with his audience. He effectively abutment his main opinion about the problem in the industrialized …show more content…
He first does this when he wrote about the animal conditions in the American farms, “like tail docking or beak-clipping or, in the industry’s latest plan, by simply engineering the “stress gene” out of pigs and chicken” (Pollan, 214). This information might be surpassing for a lot of us, Pollen effectively introduce to us this actions in the American industrial farm, to persuade us of it moral and its human behavior. Right after he finishes his topic about the bad conditions in those farms he moves on to describes his visit to “Joel Salatin’s extraordinary farm”. Visiting the farm provides Pollan with more credibility as he himself went to the farm and took a look of what is going on there. This also shows us that he is seriously considering this topic. He wrote: “Salatin’s chickens live like chickens; his cows, like cows; pigs, pigs” (Pollan, 214). When talking about his visit to this different farm Pollan sounds more natural as he speaking about what he sees, which makes him more convincing and trustworthy to his readers. By comparing this two farms He points out that we can eat animal as long as there is a farm that threats its animals in a human

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