Mexican Dream Act

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It’s also said that the Dream Act has taxpayers pay for those illegal immigrants educations. According to National Immigration Law Center: “The DREAM Act would not cost money; it would make money for taxpayers. A very conservative estimate finds that the average DREAM Act student will make $1 million more over his or her lifetime simply by obtaining legal status, which will net tens of thousands of additional dollars per student for federal, state, and local treasuries.”

The Dream Act is in no intent to have illegal immigrants believe that it’s convenient to come to the United States illegally. In all good terms the Dream Act is trying to send a message that they're willing to help their children continue with their dreams of starting
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(Richard G. & Arnoldo L. pg.4) How badly mistreated farm workers were back in the late 1960’s and so on was abominable. They were forbidden their civil and labor rights considering that they didn’t obtain any legal residency in the United States. As already stated, that’s how the rise of the Chicano Movement came upon. It began by many Mexican Americans who began to develop a whole new attire of political, and social consciousness. They then determined to call themselves chicanos and chicanas, who worked to enhance the political, economic, and social status of their people. (Richard G. & Arnoldo L. pg. …show more content…
They contend that farm workers shouldn’t fight for civil nor labor rights considering the facts that the majority came to the Unites States illegally. Now how was it that they were going to give illegal aliens rights when they don’t consent on being legal United States residence. Former House of Representative John Boehner mentions that the only way he believes it's somewhat okay is by illegal immigrants willing to admit their culpability, pass meticulous background checks, pay significant fines and back taxes, develop proficiency in English and American civics, and be able to support themselves and families without access to public benefits (John Boehner). Overall still speaking that it’s not okay to give rights to those who are not citizens of the United States.
Conclusion
In completion, illegal immigration has numerous of contradicting views to which they oppose one another. Including whether or not illegal immigration is a serious problem or not. Contradicting if illegal immigrants are just criminals or they genuinely come to the United States to help provide a better life for themselves and their families. Altogether illegal immigration has become a widely considerable event in today’s society. For all the reasons formerly said such as: is illegal immigration a serious problem, the american dream, the dream act, do they hurt the economy, and the

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